william westmoreland

william westmoreland

Barbaric act of the Korean military during the Vietnam War

5mo ago
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tay_Vinh_massacre http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Go_Dai_massacre http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phong_Nhi_and_Phong_Nhat_massacre http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ha_My_massacre http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lai_Daihan Tay Vinh massacre The Tay Vinh massacre was a series of massacre conducted by the ROK Capital Division of the South Korean Army between February 12 1966 and March 17 1966 of 1,200 unarmed citizens in Tay Vinh village, Tay Son District of Binh Dinh Province in South Vietnam. During the special operation, Tiger Division of the South Korean Army assaulted 15 hamlets in Tay Vinh village. In the one hamlet, the Korean soldiers rounded up 68 villagers in single place and fusilladed. Only 3 villagers survived. The Tiger Division of the South Korean Army conducted similar massacres in Binh An village on the same time. Go Dai massacre The Go Dai massacre was a massacre conducted by the ROK Capital Division of the South Korean Army on 26 February 1966 of unarmed citizens in Go Dai hamlet, Binh An village, Tay Son District of Binh Dinh Province in South Vietnam. The Tiger Division of the South Korean Army killed 380 villagers within an hour. They gathered 380 inhabitants, and they slaughtered them all during one hour. Phong Nhi and Phong Nhat massacre The Phong Nhi and Phong Nhat massacre was a massacre conducted by the 2nd Marine Brigade of the South Korean Marines on 12 February 1968 of unarmed citizens in Phong Nhi and Phong Nhat village, Dien Ban District of Quang Nam Province in South Vietnam. After the massacre, US marines and South Vietnam Army reached the village on the day; they treated and transported surviving villagers to the hospitals. When the massacre occurred, the Phong Nhi villagers had a close relationship with U.S. Marines and the village men volunteered as South Vietnam Army. On 25 February the next massacre occurred in Ha My village. Ha My massacre The Ha My massacre was a massacre conducted by the South Korean Marines on 25 February 1968 of unarmed citizens in Ha My village, Quang Nam in South Vietnam. The victims were 135 women, children and elders from the thirty households. After the massacre, the South Korean Marines bulldozed a shallow grave and buried the victims' bodies en mass. Former ROK Vietnam Expeditionary Forces Commanding Officer Lieutenant general Chae Myeong-shin (ko) conceded that Chief of Staff of the United States Army General William Westmoreland demanded the investigation several times. Then South Korea replied that the massacre was a plot of the Viet Cong who wore the ROK Marine uniforms. On 10 January 1970, Colonel Robert Morehead Cook, United States Army inspector general reported the massacre was conducted by the South Korean Marines. The Korean soldier often killed women after raping them in a brutal way, and in particular, according to the Local villager, the Korean forces were dreads for women. At least 9,000 of private citizens are killed by the Korean military . The U.S. forces examined that they transferred the Korean military to the area that was not considered to be a problem even if they murdered anyone. After the war the Memorial Tower for the victims was built in the village. The victims' names are listed on the stone monument. Interview to Chae Myeong-shin Vietnam dispatch forces Commander in chief by Hankyoreh performed in November, 2000, Chae Myeong-shin confessed that there were conflicting perspectives between United States and South Korea, because Americans lacked knowledge of guerrilla tactics, however Americans fully adapted the South Korean methodology later. A Lai Daihan(Lai Tai Han) is a person born to a South Korean father and a Vietnamese mother during the Vietnam War. "Lai," which is a word, means "mixed blood" including insulting meaning, and "Daihan" is the Vietnamese pronunciation of Korea . Lai Daihan was left by the withdrawal of the Korean military by the Paris agreement and collapse of the later South Vietnam ...