university of oregon

university of oregon

TEDMED Great Challenges: Making the Grade: Examining the Case for Patient Activation Measures

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In 2004, researchers from the University of Oregon developed a scale called the Patient Activation Measure (PAM) to determine how likely patients were to know about and to confidently take a role in their own care. Since then, research has suggested that "activated" patients are less likely to have an ER visit, be obese or smoke, among other health measures, and more likely to save providers money.    A number of healthcare systems are already using PAM. Interesting, but with some 50 percent of patients even failing to take prescribed medications properly, current engagement methods would seem to face an uphill battle.   Are there other ways to measure likely care plan adherence? What are the benefits and the drawbacks of measuring patient skills and cooperation?  How can patients improve scores?  Join our guests, include:  - Judith Hibbard, Professor of Health Policy at the University of Oregon, lead author of the Patient Activation Measure survey. - Rebecca Burkholder is the Vice President of Health Policy at the National Consumers League. - Suzanne Mitchell is Assistant Professor of Family Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, a family physician and palliative medicine provider. - Sandra Elliott is the Executive Director of iMpak Health, L.L.C. a health technology startup funded by Meridian Health and a member of the 2013 TEDMED Hive. - Alan Spiro is the Chief Medical Officer at Accolade, Inc. - Emily Kramer-Golinkoff is the co-founder of Emily's Entourage, a nonprofit organization that raises funds and awareness to cure Cystic Fibrosis and was named AbbVie's Thriving Graduate Scholar in 2011. Share your questions here on G+ or via #GreatChallenges .