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Bad News - Trailer

4d ago
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Bad News: The seedy underworld that lies behind Murdoch's phone hacking controversy Available on iTunes: https://geo.itunes.apple.com/gb/movie/bad-news/id1118264375?mt=6 Get in now on Google Play: https://play.google.com/store/movies/details/Bad_News?id=QQaf0kzJec8&hl=en_GB Watch now on JMAN.tv: https://jman.tv/film/4651/Bad+News Subscribe to journeyman for daily uploads: http://www.youtube.com/journeymanpictures For downloads and more information visit: https://www.journeyman.tv/film/5310/bad-news Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/journeymanpictures Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JourneymanVOD https://twitter.com/JourneymanNews Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/journeymanpictures What do you do when you're a journalist with an editor demanding an exclusive story for the front page? At News of the World you employed a foul-mouthed private investigator with a criminal record to steal the information you needed. As this investigative documentary shows, the News of the World had for many years operated an industrial-scale phone hacking enterprise to get their scoops, hacking even into the phone of a 13-year-old murder victim. In the UK private detectives supplied the facts says former red top news exec Alistair Campbell; "they were in a sense replacing journalists, because the private detectives could do things the journalists can't". Jonathan Rees was one such private detective. A suspect in an axe murder investigation and a convicted criminal, he supplied information to the News of the World for several years, running a full-time business from it. Not only that but he'd been re-hired straight out of prison, having served a sentence for trying to frame an innocent woman in a custody case ... by planting drugs on her, just to get a story. But phone hacking and planting drugs weren't the only methods used. Bribing corrupt policemen who would provide the kind of private information guaranteed to win the reporter a prime spot in the paper was another. All these tools formed part of an endemic surveillance operation that covered kidnap victims, celebrities, police investigators and politicians. In fact it was the complex network of corruption that the News of the World had built up that allowed the paper to get away for so long with the claim that the scandal was all the work of a single reporter. "News International managed to get its filthy, slimy tentacles in every nook and cranny of the Metropolitan police and to all intents and purpose that corrupted it." So when an investigation was launched the police didn't look too hard and then refused to re-open the case. But then a Guardian journalist, Nick Davies, published a story about the News of the World hacking into murder victim Milly Dowler's phone. It shifted the weight of public feeling and the vice-like grip that Murdoch had held over British politics suddenly loosened. "MPs in flocks crossed the floor, deserting the previous alliance." As the walls now close in on the Murdoch empire this shocking film lays bare the full extent of corruption in the tabloid paper. How could Murdoch have possibly been ignorant of such widespread criminality? ABC Australia – Ref. 5310 Every week Journeyman offers a brand new documentary, fresh out of the cutting room. They're award winning documentaries, some destined for the festival circuit and some for broadcast. The one thing you can know is that here you get to see them when they're fresh, often before they appear anywhere else. To watch them in full go to our VOD platform at http://jman.tv