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Lee Seung Hwan(이승환) - Across the universe(cov. The Beatles) Live From Shinsegae Main store 20150520

8h ago
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Thanks for the video JHH sista. love you! "Across The Universe" by the Beatles Words are flowing out like endless rain into a paper cup They slither wildly as they slip away across the universe Pools of sorrow, waves of joy are drifting through my opened mind Possessing and caressing me Jai Guru Deva OM Nothing's gonna change my world Nothing's gonna change my world Nothing's gonna change my world Nothing's gonna change my world Images of broken light which dance before me like a million eyes They call me on and on across the universe Thoughts meander like a restless wind inside a letter box They tumble blindly as they make their way across the universe Jai Guru Deva OM Nothing's gonna change my world Nothing's gonna change my world Nothing's gonna change my world Nothing's gonna change my world Sounds of laughter, shades of life are ringing through my open ears Inciting and inviting me Limitless undying love which shines around me like a million suns It calls me on and on, across the universe Jai Guru Deva OM Nothing's gonna change my world Nothing's gonna change my world Nothing's gonna change my world Nothing's gonna change my world Jai Guru Deva Jai Guru Deva Jai Guru Deva Jai Guru Deva [Jai Guru Deva Om is a mantra, in the ancient Indic tongue of Sanskrit, mostly known for being recited in the song "Across the Universe" by the Beatles, released in 1969 and covered by many artists since, including Fiona Apple and Rufus Wainwright. In short, the meaning is "Thanks to the divine teacher." The Guru Deva is the person who taught the Maharishi. A breakdown of the etymology is as follows: Jai means "I give hope", or "thanks to" and can also mean "victory" or "salutations". Guru means "teacher" Dev means "god" or "heavenly one". The "a" on the end of the word "Dev" in the song appears to have been added by John Lennon, but in Sanskrit verse it is not a rare modification of words for the sake of rhythm and other poetic considerations, due to the unique qualities of Sanskrit consonants (see the article on the Sanskrit alphabet). Om or Ohm is the sound of the balance of the universe, frequently invoked in meditations of the Indic religions. Its purpose (both in the song and in meditations) is to establish contact with the universe.]