research director

research director

CAFO2014 OVC- Dr. Kathryn Whetten & Dr. Charles Nelson

1d ago
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"What neuroscience and social science tell us about the effect of care environments on children" This talk includes discussion of the Positive Outcomes for Orphans study (POFO) and the Bucharest Early Intervention Project (BEIP). Dr. Kathryn Whetten is a Professor of Public Policy and Global Health with additional appointments in Community and Family Medicine and Nursing at Duke University. She is the Director of the Center for Health Policy and Inequalities Research, which is part of the Duke Global Health Institute, as well as the Research Director of the Hart Fellows Program at Duke University. Professor Whetten's research has uncovered the important role of traumatic events in populations of HIV-infected and vulnerable children and adults, and has designed interventions to assist these individuals with coping skills. Over the past decade, much of her work has focused on individual, family, community and living group factors that negatively and positively influence the outcomes of orphans and vulnerable children (OVC), including the largest multi-country (Kenya, Tanzania, Ethiopia, Cambodia and India) longitudinal study of orphaned and abandoned children. Professor Whetten has been the Principle Investigator for over 20 research grants and is an author of 4 books and more than 75 peer-reviewed articles. Currently Professor Whetten and her intervention, service and research team have research projects addressing HIV/AIDS, mental health, substance abuse, being orphaned or abandoned, and poverty. Charles A. Nelson III, PhD, is Professor of Pediatrics and Neuroscience and Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Additionally, he holds faculty appointments in the Harvard School of Public Health and the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and sits on the steering committee for the Harvard Center on the Developing Child and the Harvard interfaculty initiative on Mind, Brain, and Behavior. In addition, he holds the Richard David Scott Chair in Pediatric Developmental Medicine Research at Boston Children’s Hospital, and is Director of Research in the Division of Developmental Medicine. He chaired the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Early Experience and Brain Development, and served on the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) panels that wrote From Neurons to Neighborhoods, and more recently, New Directions in Child Abuse and Neglect Research.