president clinton

president clinton

USA: AL GORE ON CLINTON IMPEACHMENT

2d ago
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English/Nat U-S Vice President Al Gore says there is still time for politicians on Capitol Hill to hammer out a compromise leading to censure of President Bill Clinton, instead of impeachment. President Clinton returned to Washington after his Middle East peace mission. Gore is also calling on Republicans and Democrats to make a decision on the president that is quick and fair. So far Republicans say they'll block alternatives to an impeachment vote. Debate on the historic vote is set to begin on Thursday. Bill Clinton touched down in Washington D-C to face what could be the darkest days of his presidency. He was returning from his critical mission to the Middle East where he had tried to put the peace process back on track. But hope appears to be fading on the other crisis facing the White House, as more Republicans were lining up in favour of a vote to impeach President Clinton. The White House has waged a last-minute battle to win over moderate Republicans to an impeachment alternative. That prospect is dimming with the ranks of pro-impeachment Republicans growing by the hour. The turning tide against the President was enough to prompt a plea for compromise Wednesday morning from Vice President Al Gore. SOUNDBITE: (English) "Now, I would just say that I believe that on Capitol Hill there is still time for Democrats and Republicans to come together and embrace a bipartisan compromise to seek a resolution that is both quick and fair, and try to turn away form the bitter partisanship we have seen so far. That is what the American people want. And that is what is in the best interest of this country." SUPER CAPTION: Al Gore, U-S Vice President 218 votes are needed for the passage of impeachment articles through the House of Representatives. 20 Republicans are said to be still undecided on whether they'll vote for impeachment. Many of them say Clinton must confess to perjury but that's something Clinton says he won't do. Phone lines into Capitol are jammed with people voicing their views on the impeachment matter. Some were opting to make their views known in a petition calling for a censure of Bill Clinton. At least one moderate, Connecticut Republican Christopher Shays, is still planning to meet with the President on Wednesday. The White House is hoping he can help convince undecided lawmakers that a compromise move for censure is best for the nation. While there still may be room for compromise, some White House advisers are said to be preparing for a Senate showdown - resigned to impeachment in the House. Some Democrats say they are finding solace in the belief that Republicans will pay for their actions on Bill Clinton during the 2000 election cycle . You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/d994d866c7e850301d2e62dd4b20d749 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork