nuclear fission

nuclear fission

Nuclear Fission and Fusion | Doodle Science

1w ago
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Follow me!: https://twitter.com/DoodleSci Doodle Science teaches you high school physics in a less boring way in almost no time! GCSE Science Script: Nuclear power plants generate energy in today’s world by using nuclear fission. Fission is just another word for splitting. So the process of splitting a nucleus is called nuclear fission. For fission to be done in any practical way we have to use big atoms like uranium or plutonium. To start off the process, one of these isotopes must absorb a neutron. When this happens, the nucleus becomes unstable and splits into two smaller nuclei. Two or three neutrons are also released in the process, which can go on to cause a chain reaction. A lot of energy is released during nuclear fission and I mean A LOT. You could meet the demand of an average American every year with just 275g of natural uranium. That’s the equivalent to burning 4.4 tonnes of coal! Nuclear fusion as you probably guessed is the opposite of nuclear fission as you fuse atoms together instead of splitting them up. In fusion we use the smallest atoms we can get because it doesn’t require as much energy as bigger atoms would to fuse. Specifically the isotopes hydrogen-1 and hydrogen-2. We create conditions that forces these atoms to be squashed so closely that they fuse into Helium-3 and releases about 3-4 times more energy than a fission reaction. I’ll leave you to calculate the equivalent in coal.