morse code

morse code

Incredible Simple Survival or Low Tech Communications Method That Anyone Can Do

10h ago
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Description

Tap Code is perhaps the most simple method of communication without hearing audible words or seeing letters clearly. Hence it's good for communicaion over a distance (line of sight), or through walls. You probably don't even care about all of this since we have great technology today, however, just knowing about this is good enough. This method goes way back in history and is implemented by representing each letter with a number or set of numbers. The (logical) numbers themselves are then (physically) represented with "sounded or visual (light)" countable taps or "dots", hence momentary pulses of sound or light. Electromagnetic (radio) waves/pulses can also be used as the carrier of the information/code. It is even possible to rig up a string and bell (or some other indicator, led?) at both ends as the communication system. If you are close, and in line of sight to someone, it is possible to use "finger numbers" as indicated on your hands. War prisoners have often used Tap Code to communicate. Both the sender and receiver must first agree/have the code before communication can start. Also, a method to signal a communication will begin shortly must be set up...maby an exteded number of pulses until the receiver sends a signal that they are ready for communication/transmisson.....hence an "acknowlegement" signal will be sent. Use: For each letter, send the row number (ie. of taps), followed by the column number (ie. of taps) corresponding to that letter. Abbreviations / Acronyms (abbreviations for sentences) can be used. Some may have to be agreed upon beforehand, for example : TY for thankyou GBU for God Bless You WTF GTFO Learing Morse Code would be very impractical for most people since it's somewhat hard to learn and then how to implement it effectively with crude signaling devices such as light and sound. Rather than decipher/decode each letter as you receive it, it may be better to simply count the dots received and write that number down as you receive them, and repeat for each series of dots. Later when the communicaion session is over, you can translate each set of numbers to it's corresponding letter, and figure out the words and sentences by visual inspection.. Wikipedia's article on Tap Code: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tap_code In the somewhat official "grid" they show, the letter K is eliminated and C will be utilzed for itself and K also. This allows the letter Z to be utilized in the 5x5 grid. I think the letter K is used more often in words than Z is, so that is why I left K in the grid and eliminated the Z letter...... it's up you and the others communicating on what you will agree to use...of course you could heavilly code and jumble the letters in the grid so that anyone else seeing/hearing the transmission will not be able to decipher it. Since I left Z out, some scheme such as XX or YY can be usied to represent a Z letter or perhaps use (5, 6) even. I can imagine that Bell and Morse also knew and studied alot of this type of thing. Morse code is infact somewhat related to the Binary Number System since 2 main signals (a "dot" (ie 0), and a "dash" (ie. 1) signal) are utilized. To send a number you can agree that A = 1, B = 2 and so on up to J = 0. Or, you can agree that a double letter sequence indicates that numbers will now follow, maby NN would indicate that numbers follow and perhaps use A through J for the numbers, or tapout/signal the full number in dots, seperating each number with a longer pause. Double letters like AA through JJ can also represent numbers. With a straight Letter To Number system you could be tapping up to 26 times (and difficult to count and keep from making mistakes) to make a Z letter...and an average of half of that, or 13 taps, would be necessisary for each letter. Using the Tap Code as shown in the video, at most only 10 taps would be needed for the Y letter (Y = 5, 5 , and since 5 taps + 5 taps = 10 taps), and an average of...