lava lake

lava lake

Russia: Fire meets ice as Plosky Tolbachik erupts

2d ago
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1. M/S Lava eruption at night 2. W/S Tourists collecting rocks flee from eruption 3. M/S Lava eruption 4. W/S Lava lake 5. C/U Lava lake 6. M/S Lava lake 7. W/S Lava lake 8. C/U Lava lake 9. W/S Lava lake 10. W/S Lava lake in the centre of the Plosky Tolbachik volcano (shot from helicopter) 11. C/U Lava 12. W/S Tourist walking by volcano surface 13. C/U Tourist's boots make rock fall 14. W/S Lava river under surface 15. W/S Tourists walk amongst clouds of smoke 16. W/S Clouds of steam billow with snow tipped mountain in the background SCRIPT Russia: Fire meets ice as Plosky Tolbachik erupts Lava continues to spew from the Plosky Tolbachik volcano in Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, forming its own lakes and rivers while creating a landscape reminiscent of Mordor in the "Lord of the Rings." A luminous orange lava lake has also formed in the active zone. The volcano has been active since November 2012 after being dormant for 36 years. The obvious hazard of being close to an active volcano has not deterred dozens of tourists from spending several days making their way to the crater on foot to witness the eruptions and the lava lakes for themselves. Lava from the volcano has torched trees and destroyed a station used by the Institute of Vulcanology and Seismology, the Leningradskaya volcano research base and a Volcanoes of Kamchatka base. Officers from Russia's Emergencies Ministry are present to ensure the safety of groups of sightseeing tourists who have been gathering near the foot of the volcano. The ongoing eruption does not pose a threat to nearby towns, with the closest inhabited locality about 50 kilometres away. Tolbachik is a volcanic complex in Kamchatka that consists of two separate volcanoes: Plosky meaning "flat" in Russian and Ostry meaning "sharp". Its eruptive history stretches back thousands of years, with the most notable eruption known occurring in 1975. Known as "The Great Tolbachik Fissure Eruption," the eruption produced one of the largest amounts of lava ever recorded in Kamchatka. The entire complex is 3,682 metres (12,080 feet) tall. The Kamchatka Peninsula, located in the Russian Far East, is one of the most volcanically active regions in the world. Of its more than 300 volcanoes, 29 are currently active.