jim gray

jim gray

Petrified Music and Wood (Abstract Art)

1d ago
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I have something different here for you. I hope this video will take you on a trip both musically and visually. Every trip I take out west, I usually come back with at least a few good landscape shots etc., but little did I know on my 2014 trip I would stumble upon a treasure chest of natural abstract art found in petrified wood. There I was in Holbrook Arizona, going from place to place looking at petrified wood with my friend Lloyd Taylor. He let me wander around a large petrified wood store (Jim Gray's) for an hour and I began to be drawn in by the splendid color of the cut and polished wood. So I got out the camera and began shooting the pieces. Then I drew in closer and then realized this is the most beautiful abstract art I had ever seen and will ever see. It appealed to me greatly, so I shot hundreds of photos of petrified wood at various locations in Holbrook and near the petrified national forest. I created some music that I thought would fit more appropriately than what I usually do. I think it worked well enough to evoke a sense of the span of time it takes to create such beauty in this wood stone. As you look at these images, see if you can spot faces, figures, and likenesses. I see all sorts of things in these displays of color. I think I am the first on You Tube to present the petrified wood in this perspective of abstract art, and to enhance the richness by adding some spacey/abstract music. After all, it is mind-boggling to think about how these trees of long ago turned to stone. Leading scientists say around 200 million years ago. Some religious skeptics say they can make petrified wood in a laboratory in a few days. Well, you can make a river in the lab in a few minutes by dumping water in an area of soil. But that's not reality. They also say they can make a form of coal in the lab too in a day or so. But the coal we humans mine hundreds of feet below the earth once was a thriving forest and vegetation that got buried and compressed over millions of years. It takes long, long stretches of time to bring about such changes. The religious-book view is it could have only happened within a 5,000 or so year time span. Do we know how short 5,000 years is? Just find fifty 100 year-old men and line them up back to back in time. That is only fifty men! Five thousand years could barely add or remove a layer of two or three feet of soil over the landscape. Try going below the earth 500 feet and finding a coal vein. Can we put that coal vein down 500 feet in a laboratory experiment? No. My personal view is that of the leading scientists; that it took millions of years to form this real petrified wood. Was it 225 million? We don't specifically know but it could have been fewer millions. In the lab I could make a small glacier for my model railroad town and push it along the landscape until it levels all the buildings. In the lab I could make a small scale mountain in a matter of minutes by pushing up on some rock embedded in a sand box of soil and earth. It would be great for my model railroad layout. But that's not reality. Changes in a lab and changes in reality are completely different. Heck, I could make a planet earth the size of a beach ball with some packed soil, grow some plants, set up a bright light ten feet away and watch the plants grow! I could even rotate the sphere in the lab. But that's not reality. This is just my opinion here and I respect other folks opinions too. We all can't think alike and that's fine. To each their own. IT's all very interesting to discuss and talk about. I think humans can figure this stuff out and much they have. It takes a long time to build upon education/science, but it only takes seconds to accept a belief in something. I hope you enjoyed the video and music. I could not have done it without going to Arizona and being shown around by my friend Lloyd Taylor. He is the best tour guide in Arizona, and is full of knowledge about Arizona. He is a geologist ...