investigative reporting

investigative reporting

America: What Went Wrong? Finance, Wall Street, Taxes, Health Care, Pensions (2013)

3mo ago
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Donald L. Barlett (born July 17, 1936) is an American investigative journalist and author who often collaborates with James B. Steele. According to The Washington Journalism Review (Magazine) they were a better investigative reporting team than even Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. Together they have won two Pulitzer Prizes, two National Magazine Awards and six George Polk Awards. In addition, they have been recognized by their peers with awards from Investigative Reporters and Editors on five separate occasions. They are known for their reporting technique of delving deep into documents and then, after what could be a long investigative period, interviewing the necessary sources. The duo has been working together for over 40 years and is frequently referred to as Barlett and Steele. Barlett was raised in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. After attending Pennsylvania State University, he served three years as a special agent with the US Army Counter Intelligence Corps until 1956, when he began his journalistic career as a reporter for the Reading (Pennsylvania) Times. Nine years later he become an investigative journalist for The Plain Dealer, and later took similar jobs with The Chicago Daily News and The Philadelphia Inquirer, where he was to join his collaborator James B. Steele. In 1997, Barlett and Steele became an editors-at-large for Time. In 2006, they moved to Vanity Fair as contributing editors. Over the years, Barlett and Steele wrote on such diverse topics as crime, housing, nuclear waste, tax loopholes, the decline of the middle class's standard of living, Howard Hughes, the role of big money in politics, oil prices, immigration and health care. Barlett and Steele won two Pulitzers and were recognized for their contributions to American journalism for their work while at The Philadelphia Inquirer. In 1972, during one of their earliest collaborations for The Inquirer, Barlett and Steele pioneered the use of computers for the analysis of data on violent crimes.[citation needed] Barlett and Steele won their first Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 1975 for a series called "Auditing the Internal Revenue Service" published by The Inquirer. They won their second Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 1989 at the Inquirer for their coverage of temporary tax breaks embedded in the Tax Reform Act of 1986. Their 1991 Inquirer series America: What Went Wrong? was named by the New York University department of journalism as 51st on its list of the 100 best pieces of journalism of the 20th century. Rewritten as a book it became a No. 1 New York Times bestseller. It is one of seven books Barlett and Steele have published, five of which were written while at the The Inquirer. After 26 years as a team for The Inquirer, Barlett and Steele left to pursue investigative reporting at Time. It was while they were at Time that the investigative reporting team won their two National Magazine Awards, as well at their record breaking 6th George Polk Award, although this time for excellence in magazine journalism. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_L._Barlett James B. Steele (born January 3, 1943) is an American investigative journalist and author. With longtime collaborator Donald L. Barlett he has won two Pulitzer Prizes, two National Magazine Awards and five George Polk Awards during their thirty five years of service at the Philadelphia Inquirer, Time, and Vanity Fair. The duo are frequently referred to as Barlett and Steele. Steele was born in Hutchinson, Kansas and was raised in Kansas City, Missouri. He graduated from the University of Missouri–Kansas City and began his career at the Kansas City Times, where he covered politics, labor and urban affairs. In 1970 he joined the Philadelphia Inquirer, where he would begin his collaboration with Barlett. In a 1972 collaboration for The Philadelphia Inquirer, Steele and Barlett pioneered the use of computers for the analysis of data on violent crimes. Twenty years later, they co...