hydrogen gas

hydrogen gas

Wendelstein 7-X Stellarator - Germany's Nuclear Fusion Experiment Begins With Success

9h ago
SOURCE  

Description

Scientists in Germany successfully completed another phase of an experiment designed to one day produce nuclear Fusion. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Particle Physics heated up a small sample of hydrogen to over 170 million degrees Fahrenheit using the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator, a donut-shaped device that uses magnetic fields to suspend hydrogen gas while zapping it with powerful microwaves. They succeeded in creating a super-hot plasma, which lasted for about a quarter of a second, according to a news release from the institute. Although fleeting, this experiment successfully demonstrated that plasma can be contained while heated to such extremes, a key step in harnessing nuclear fusion. The Wendelstein stellarator is not meant to produce energy, but rather to test the processes needed to achieve fusion. Wednesday’s test was the first of many such hopeful experiments. The Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) reactor is an experimental stellarator (nuclear fusion reactor) built in Greifswald, Germany, by the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP), and completed in October 2015. It is a further development of Wendelstein 7-AS. The purpose of Wendelstein 7-X is to evaluate the main components of a future fusion reactor built using stellarator technology, even if Wendelstein 7-X itself is not an economical fusion power plant. Copyright Disclaimer: Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) ist eine Experimentieranlage zur Erforschung der Kernfusionstechnik, die in Greifswald vom Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP) betrieben wird. Die Hauptkomponente ist eine Fusionsanlage vom Stellarator-Typ. Mit W7-X sollen die physikalischen und technischen Grundlagen untersucht sowie die prinzipielle Kraftwerkstauglichkeit von Kernfusionsreaktoren dieses Typs demonstriert werden; eine nennenswerte Freisetzung von Fusionsenergie ist mit dieser Anlage noch nicht vorgesehen und nicht möglich. Andere Forschungsanlagen wie der im Bau befindliche ITER arbeiten nach dem Tokamak-Prinzip. Für welches Reaktorkonzept man sich bei einem zukünftig eventuell machbaren Fusions-Leistungsreaktor entscheiden wird, ist zurzeit noch nicht abzusehen.