gangsta rapper

gangsta rapper

The Final Triumph

1w ago
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Description

When Joyce Handler's Reflections of Hope came out in 1995, the front cover described this new age CD as "instrumental music for hope, healing, and renewal" -- and that's exactly the sort of description that new age audiences love to hear. In new age circles, a stereotypical phrase like "hope, healing, and renewal" is designed to give the artist credibility -- sort of like a gangsta rapper claiming that he's "straight out the 'hood," a country singer telling you that his songs are about "cheatin', drinkin', heartbreakin,' and hurtin'," or a death metal artist insisting that his album offers "60 minutes of pure, unmitigated evil." In other words, it's about using stereotypical images of your genre as an effective marketing tool. But if Reflections of Hope employs imagery that is stereotypically new age, it is also a cut above many of the new age discs that came out in 1995. Handler, who is a clinical psychologist as well as a musician/composer/producer, brings a variety of influences to the table -- not only new age, but also rock, folk, and Euro-classical. And she ends up providing a CD that has more of an edge than a lot of the new age that came out in the mid-'90s. While Reflections of Hope is peaceful, calm, and tranquil -- all of the things new age audiences are looking for in a CD -- it isn't elevator muzak. Handler's celestial, dreamy melodies have some substance; relaxation is obviously the ultimate goal, but she isn't mindless about it. Instead, Handler provides a calming environment without being dull, mechanical, or uninteresting. This disc is skimpy by CD standards; it clocks in at a mere 34 minutes. Regardless, Reflections of Hope deserves to be recognized as one of the more substantial new age releases of 1995. _________________________________________________________________ http://www.allmusic.com/album/reflections-of-hope-mw0000614519