freedom of the press

freedom of the press

U.S. Copies China, Restricts Press at All Levels

1d ago
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Paul Joseph Watson Reports www.prisonplanet.com When Sky News reporter Mark Stone was detained by Chinese police during a live broadcast, the communist superpower essentially got caught red-handed while trying to stifle coverage of one of their most embarrassing authoritarian moments — namely Tiananmen Square. What the world already knows about China's heavy-handed censorship was put on display after the British journalist made passing mention of the 1989 incident and was dragged away to a police van, with officials apparently unaware that the signal was still going out. This kind of behavior, while shameful, is perhaps expected in a place like China. But the United States, renowned for its freedoms, has routinely intimidated its citizens for daring to film in public too, particularly when confronting controversial topics, establishing chilling blows to the First Amendment which guarantees free speech and a free press. Since 9/11, these freedoms have been openly trashed as law enforcement and security guards have been trained to treat journalists as criminals and anyone with a camera as a potential terrorist. Despite Homeland Security's repeated attempts to profile journalists, and prosecute those who take pictures of federal buildings or record police or TSA encounters, recent court cases have upheld the fact that photography is NOT a crime, and free speech remains a protected civil right. This special report details how Infowars reporters have repeatedly been harassed for filming in public places, a problem that is compounded by widespread ignorance on the part of police, TSA and security on location