fleischer studios

fleischer studios

[Popeye the Sailor -- She-Sick Sailors # 131 December 8, 1944]

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[Popeye the Sailor -- Famous Studios This is a list of the 122 cartoons starting from No 110 starring Popeye the Sailor and produced by Paramount Pictures' Famous Studios (later known as Paramount Cartoon Studios) from 1942 to 1957. These cartoons were produced after Paramount took ownership of Fleischer Studios, which originated the Popeye cartoon series in 1933. All cartoons are one-reel in length (6 to 10 minutes). The first 14 shorts (You're a Sap, Mr. Jap through Cartoons Ain't Human) are in black-and-white. All remaining cartoons, beginning with Her Honor the Mare, are in colour. Unlike the Fleischer Studios entries, the director credits for these shorts represent the actual director in charge of that short's production. The first animator credited handled the animation direction. The numbers listed next to each cartoon continue the numbering of the Fleischer entries. The black-and white Popeye cartoons were sold to television distributor Associated Artists Productions (A.A.P.) in 1956, and the colour cartoons were sold to A.A.P. the following year. The original opening and closing Paramount titles were cut for TV syndication. By the early 2000s, the Popeye shorts were owned by Turner Entertainment, whose Cartoon Network broadcast restored versions of many of the shorts as part of an anthology series called The Popeye Show. These shorts are noted below. Popeye the Sailor -- She-Sick Sailors # 131 December 8, 1944 Olive is a big fan of Superman comic books. Seeing this, Bluto disguises himself as Superman so that he can impress Olive and get rid of Popeye. Then Popeye gets into the act, too. Bluto (as the Man of Steel) and Popeye engage in a variety of duels to prove themselves worthy of their lady fair. This short has some of Sammy Timberg's music from the Max Fleischer Superman cartoons. Bluto is clean-shaven (this doesn't happen often!) so that he can impersonate Superman. In one of the few major gaffes in a Popeye cartoon, when Popeye crashes through the train, he is facing forward. But when the front of the train is shown, it appears that he was facing to his left, and when the back of the train is shown, it appears that Popeye was facing to his right.]