epic film

epic film

Li Xianglan - Seven Samurai (sung in 1954 Film) 李香兰-七人の侍/ 山口淑子-七武士

8h ago
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I have found very few film credits which name her as the singer of this song, whether as Yoshiko Yamaguchi or Koran Lee. One vietnamese website lists her as the 2nd name in the cast of Akira Kurosawa's epic film. There is an upload already at YT of this song, but no mention of her name. "This is the first version of a song (yes, with lyrics) sung by a female vocalist to the main theme of Kurosawa's film "Seven Samurai." Well, Yoshiko Yamaguchi/Li Xianglan, you did a great job here! This recording is available on KINGYOKO, CA-74383 mono released 1989. Title is "夜来香" and Li Xianglan goes by her Japanese name Yoshiko Yamaguchi with her alternative name, Koran Lee, in brackets. The latter is the Japanese translation of Li Xianglan. Some great songs on this album, including Itsuki Lullaby and Heart Song. I chose to use her Chinese name because this is the name I have come to know her by, and which led me to her recording of Seven Samurai. Li Xianglan was born Yamaguchi Yoshiko on February 12, 1920 in the outskirts of Mukden (now Shenyang ) Fushun, Manchuria. She made her debut as an actress and singer in the 1938 film Honeymoon Express 蜜月快車 by Manchuria Film Production. She was billed as Li Xianglan, pronounced Ri Kōran in Japanese. The adoption of a Chinese stage name was prompted by the Film company's economic and political motives—a Manchurian girl who had command over both the Japanese and Chinese languages was much sought after. She became almost exclusively billed as Li Xianglan, though occasionally she appeared as Yamaguchi Yoshiko. The 1940 film Shanghai Nights (上海の夜) upset many Chinese people when Yoshiko's character, a Chinese woman, is slapped by a Japanese man, but instead of hatred, she reacts with gratitude. One of her classic songs, "Suzhou Serenade" (蘇州夜曲) is still banned in mainland China. Ironically, when she visited Japan during this period, she was criticized for being too Chinese in dress and in language. At the end of World War II, she was arrested by the Chinese government for treason and collaboration with the Japanese. However, she was cleared of all charges since she was not a Chinese national. In 1946, she settled in Japan and launched a new career there under her birth name Yoshiko Yamaguchi. In the 1950s she established her acting career in Hollywood and Broadway as Shirley Yamaguchi. Later she revived her Li Xianglan name and appeared in several Chinese-language films made in Hong Kong. In 1969 she became the host of The Three O'Clock TV show, reporting on Palestine as well as the Vietnam War. In 1974, she was elected to the House of Councillors (the upper House of the Japanese parliament), where she served for 18 years. She co-authored the book, Ri Koran, Watashi no Hansei (Half My Life as Ri Koran). She now serves as a Vice-President of the Asian Women's Fund. A remarkable woman, and a wonderful singer. Music: Fumio Hayasaka Lyrics on a free-form rendition of a translation by Mrs Mariko Oikawa (thank you to treemarks) Samurai, like a banner flying in the storm stay cheerful even in suffering keep your spirit even in the worst situation Let me be remembered as another Samurai the same like my fellow warriors Samurai, running like the wind I was with a fellow warrior yesterday today, he is no more my life is coming to an end as well but my love will be with you always !