environmental impact

environmental impact

The Christmas food of the future: “Mince Flies"

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We teamed up with Gastronaut Stefan Gates to create real “Mince Flies” – they’re made with mealworm beetle larvae and locusts, mixed with traditional dried fruit and spices. We’re rethinking the traditional Christmas dinner to raise awareness of sustainable food this holiday season and get young people to consider the environmental impact of the food we eat. Children from Graveney School and Harris Academy in London handed out “Mince Flies” to hungry Christmas shoppers in London’s Borough Market today. With the world population set to grow to 9 billion by 2050, the earth’s finite resources are under increasing pressure and scientists think our global agricultural output needs to increase by 70% to feed this number of people. Traditional meat production causes sustainability issues, including large greenhouse gas emissions; insects on the other hand are very efficient consumers of resources. Over 2 billion people around the world already eat insects as a regular part of their diet – that’s 33% of the global population. Thailand for example already has 20,000 small scale insect farms rearing over 7,500 tonnes of grasshoppers, crickets and other edible insects a year. Stefan Gates will be returning to The Big Bang UK Young Scientists & Engineers Fair at the NEC, Birmingham from 11-14 March 2015. He’ll be performing “Supertasters”, a high-octane show exploring the science of food. To register or for more information visit http://www.thebigbangfair.co.uk