environmental impact

environmental impact

WALKING ON OIL - ALBERTA'S OIL SANDS / TV documentary

3h ago
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Description

Producer/Director/Writer: George Angelescu - www.c21etv.com Narrator: Paul Bouche "Walking on oil - Alberta's oil sands" identifies 10 major energy companies, all involved in oil sands projects in Alberta: Syncrude, Suncor, Shell, Western, Chevron, Albian Sands, Terasen Pipelines, EnCana, Imperial Oil - Esso, and Patrol-Canada. Fifty-eight companies are involved in 120 oil sands projects in Northern Alberta, Canada. Watch "Walking on oil - Alberta's oil sands". Discover the real truth about the biggest oil deposits in the world and the stunning environmental impact of oil exploration in the spectacular scenery of Alberta's oil country. Concerns about the future supplies of conventional oil have attracted new attention to the potential yield from "oil sands." Walking on oil - Alberta's Oil Sands" focuses on the Province's crude bitumen oil sands - estimated to be the World's largest Hydrocarbon deposits. According to the World Energy Council, Alberta's reserves are estimated to contain 2,500 billion barrels. Certain experts claim that Alberta's oil sands contain more petroleum than Saudi Arabia's oil fields, and enough resources to supply Canada's energy for more than 475 years, or total World's energy needs for up to 15 years. But does the World need this oil resource? Alberta's Oil Sands - The Problem And The Conflict: The fuel from the tar sands is thick and heavy and is bound to water and sand. Extraction of the oil and refining it destroys countless miles of forestland and requires enormous amounts of energy and water. Tar sands oil production creates 2 to 3 times as much greenhouse gas as production of conventional oil hence the contribution to global warming. Enormous machinery is used to remove trees, rocks, soil and sand from the earth and once the tar sands are removed, the resulting huge holes in the ground remain along with the toxic water-borne tailings. As a world together, we have to make the right decisions about the extraction and use of Alberta's immense oil resource.