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[Iran Military unveils ADVANCED MISSILES to send message to US and Israel]

4d ago
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[Iran military has unveled new long range missiles to boost it's military power and to send a clear message to the US military and Israel. Iran has unveiled a new long-range land-to-land cruise missile, named Soumar, which has been designed and manufactured by domestic experts. The new state-of-the-art high-precision missile was unveiled during a Sunday ceremony in Tehran with senior Iranian officials, including Defense Minister Brigadier General Hossein Dehqan, in attendance. During the ceremony, Deqhan (pictured below) said Soumar “enjoys different characteristics in terms of range and pinpoint accuracy in comparison with the previous products.” Such important achievements, which have been made through research and innovation based on the needs of Iranian Armed Forces, are “considered as crucial steps toward increasing the country’s defense and deterrence might,” Dehqan added. The Iranian defense chief stressed that Tehran aims to promote the range, precision and destructive power of such type of missiles in the upgraded versions, which are to be unveiled in the next Iranian calendar year (starting on March 21). Dehqan also announced that the long-range ballistic missiles of Qadr and Qiam have been delivered in mass to the Aerospace Division of the Islamic Revolution Guards Corps (IRGC). During the occasion, Commander of the IRGC Aerospace Division Brigadier General Amirali Hajizadeh hailed Iran’s great defense capabilities, adding that Western sanctions have failed to disrupt the progress of the Islamic Republic’s defense program. Hajizadeh also warned that Terhan will never put to negotiation the country’s defense capabilities, including the development of its ballistic missiles. On Saturday, a senior Iranian commander said the country is to unveil a long-range missile defense system, connected to the S-200 missile system. According to Iran's Khatam al-Anbiya Air Defense Base Brigadier General Farzad Esmaili, the Talaash-3 (Endeavor-3) system is to be unveiled on April 18, when the country marks National Army Day. In recent years, Iran has made great achievements in its defense sector and reached self-sufficiency in producing essential military equipment and systems. Iran has repeatedly assured other countries that its military might poses no threat to other states, insisting that the country’s defense doctrine is entirely based on deterrence. The Armed Forces of the Islamic Republic of Iran (Persian: نيروهای مسلح جمهوری اسلامی ايران‎) include the IRIA (ارتش جمهوری اسلامی ایران), the IRGC (سپاه پاسداران انقلاب اسلامی) and the Law Enforcement Force[4] (نيروی انتظامی جمهوری اسلامی ایران). These forces total about 545,000 active personnel (not including the Law Enforcement Force).[5] All branches of armed forces fall under the command of General Headquarters of Armed Forces (ستاد کل نیروهای مسلح). The Ministry of Defense and Armed Forces Logistics is responsible for planning logistics and funding of the armed forces and is not involved with in-the-field military operational command. History[edit] Main article: Military history of Iran When the Pahlavi dynasty took power in 1925, following years of war with Russia, the standing Persian army was almost non-existent. The new king Reza Shah Pahlavi, was quick to develop a new military. In part, this involved sending hundreds of officers to European and American military academies. It also involved having foreigners re-train the existing army within Iran. In this gap the Iranian Air Force was established and the foundation for a new Navy was laid. Britain and the Soviet Union invaded Iran in 1941 in order to secure the area from German interventions. Following World War II, 1500 Iranian troops supported the Sultan of Oman against the Dhofar Rebellion from 1962–1975. In 1971, Iranian forces besieged Abu Musa and the Tunb islands. Before the Islamic revolution of 1979, Iran contributed to United Nations peacekeeping operations. Iran joined ONUC in the Congo in the...