atlantic records

atlantic records

78 The Clovers Skylark Atlantic 934 B

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DISCLAIMER: All rights reserved to the production companies and music labels that distributed and produced the music and performance respectively. I've only added the footage as a tribute for historical, entertainment, and creative purposes with no financial gain. Copyright infringement not intended. The Clovers Skylark Atlantic 934 B 1951 Here are The Clovers with their very first hit from 1951, from Ahmet Ertegun's Atlantic Label, "Skylark." This was supposed to be a typical "B" side, fortunately, this was the BIG HIT. Please enjoy! The Clovers were formed at Armstrong High School, Washington, D.C. in 1946 by Harold Lucas (baritone), Billy Shelton and Thomas Woods. Initially a trio they expanded to a quartet with the addition of John "Buddy" Bailey (lead) and began calling themselves The Four Clovers. Billy Shelton was replaced by Matthew McQuater (tenor) in 1948. As The Four Clovers, the group started to appear at local amateur music shows including the WWDC amateur hour show hosted by Jack Lowe Endler at the Republic Theatre. This drew them to the attention of a wider audience including Harold Winley (bass) who after hearing them on WWDC decided to introduce himself to the group. By the end of 1948 Woods had been replaced by Harold Winley. By the end of 1950 Bill Harris (Born 14 April 1925, Nashville, Tennessee) had joined as their guitarist; his blues and jazz inflected playing would become an integral part of their sound. Krefetz then brought them to the attention of Atlantic Records who signed the group in February 1951. The Clovers were immediately booked by the Shaw Artists agency to perform at the Apollo Theater in Harlem starting on the 15 February. The Clovers went into the studio for their first recording session for Atlantic Records that included the Ahmet Ertegun composition "Don't You Know I Love You". Their first Atlantic session on February 22, 1951, at the Apex Recording Studios in New York. With Buddy Bailey in the lead, and the Frank "Floorshow" Culley band behind them (along with Bill Harris, who always played on their sessions), they recorded only two sides: the bouncy "Don't You Know I Love You" and the ballad "Skylark." The first of these was credited to Ahmet Ertegun under his reverse pen name "Nugetre"; the other tune was a 1942 opus by Hoagy Carmichael and Johnny Mercer, which had been popularized by Ray Eberle, along with the Glenn Miller Orchestra. In an R&B vein, it had been done previously by Billy Eckstine, singing with the Earl Hines Orchestra. "Skylark," which was given to them by Atlantic (although the Clovers were familiar with the song), was basically done as a Pop tune; this is the way the Clovers wanted to sound. Once the flip took off, however, it would be a long time before the Clovers would get back to their favorite way of singing. Most of the Clovers' up-tempo tunes would be only medium-fast, rather than driving, and with minimal instrumentation. For several years this was kind of a Clovers trademark. Their second recording session resulted in the release of "Fool, Fool, Fool" in August 1951 which by September had reached #1 in the R&B chart. The Clovers' lead vocalist, Buddy Bailey, was drafted into the army by the end of August 1951 and John Phillip was brought in to replace him. Philip was soon replaced by Charlie White (Born in 1930, Washington D.C.) who had been in the vocal groups The Dominoes and The Checkers. The tracks "One Mint Julep" (written by Rudy Toombs) and the Ertegun composition "Middle of the Night" (originally released as a 10 inch Shellac single) were both top ten hits in the R&B chart of May 1952. Their next release "Ting-A-Ling" peaked at #2 on the Billboard R&B chart (September 1952) and reached #1 on the Billboard Juke Box R&B chart. They followed up this early success with a string of R&B hits including "Hey Miss Fannie" b/w "I Played The Fool" (released October 1952), "Good Lovin'" (top ten R&B hit November 1953) and "Little Mama" b/w "Lovey Dov...