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egyptian parliament

egyptian parliament

Egypt still rising: How to finish a revolution - John Rees, Marwa Farouk, Nasr Al Zoghbi

2y ago
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http://www.dangerousideas.org.uk/ www.dangerousideas.org.uk John Rees is a writer, broadcaster and activist. His new book of essays, Timelines, A Political History of the Modern World, is about to be published by Routledge. His earlier books include The Algebra of Revolution and Imperialism and Resistance. He is co-founder of the Stop the War Coalition. He participated in the revolution that overthrew Egyptian dictator Hosni Mubarak and his most recent book, written with Joseph Daher, is The People Demand, A Short History of the Arab Revolutions. John is a member of the Counterfire editorial board. Marwa Farouk is a longstanding activist on the Egyptian left and has been part of every major struggle in Egypt for the last ten years. She was active in the Cairo Conference, the 'Enough' democracy movement and the Mahalla textile strikes. She was present in Tahrir throughout the 18 days that overthrew Mubarak. She is a lawyer and and activist in the Palestine solidarity movement. Marwa is a member of the Socialist Renewal Current. Nasr Al Zoghbi is a newly elected MP in the first Egyptian Parliament elected since the fall of Mubarak. He is part of the Revolution Continues Bloc, the most left wing grouping in the Parliament. He is MP for the constituency of Fayoum. He was previously Head of the Media Department, Faculty of Dar Al Uloom, Fayoum University. He is member of the Kifaya (Enough) movement and Member of the National Assembly for Change. He has a longstanding interest in workers issues. Speakers: John Rees, Marwa Farouk, Nasr Al Zoghbi Venue: Rich Mix Bar Time: 4.40pm Photo by Mohamed Abd El-Ghany A boy holds an Egyptian flag, Tahrir Square January 25 2012. Photo: Mohamed Abd El-Ghany Egyptian MP Nasr-Eddin al-Zoghbi joins John Rees and Marwa Farouk of the Socialist Renewal Current to discuss the revolution that was not only televised but tweeted, emailed and live streamed -- and what the future holds for the country that overthrew Mubarak.