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35 Questions Mitt Romney Must Answer About Bain Capital Before The Issue Can Go Away

2y ago
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Mitt Romney conducted numerous TV and other media interviews yesterday in order to minimize the damage his campaign has received regarding discrepancies surrounding his tenure at Bain. During times of crisis it is often a smart strategy to give virtually unlimited access to the media in order to push out your message aggressively and satisfy reporter curiosity so that the issue can be pushed of the front burner. John McCain famously did this well earlier in his career when dealing with his own Keating five controversies. Unfortunately for the Romney Campaign, The slew of TV interviews did little to satisfy the media. In times of crisis, a strong candidate will come up with answers that satisfy the basic questions surround the controversy and will make people want to move on to another subject. Romney, however, could not seem to come up with basic messages that resolved the controversies. Many of his answers seemed evasive or overly legalistic. The biggest problem for Romney is that all of his interviews have only increased the questions that political observers, voters and the media have regarding he subject of Bain Capital. Specifically, Romney is going to have to answer the following 35 questions before this issue subsides: 1. Are you contending that an individual can simultaneously be the CEO, president, managing director of a company, and its sole stockholder and somehow be "disassociated" from the company or accurately classified as someone not having "any" formal involvement with a company? 2. You have stated that in "Feb. 1999 I left Bain capital and all management responsibility" and "I had no ongoing activity or involvement." It depends on what the definition of "involvement" is, doesn't it? Clearly you were involved with Bain to the extent that you owed it. Are you defining "involvement" in a uniquely specific way that only means "full-time, active, 60-hours-a-week, hands-on manager?" 3. How exactly are you defining "involvement?" 4. Surely someone from Bain occasionally called you up and asked your opinion about something work related from 1999 to 2002. Wouldn't that qualify as "involvement," if only on a minor level? 5. You earned at least $100,000 as an executive from Bain in 2001 and 2002, separate from investment earnings according to filings with State of Massachusetts. Can you give an example of anyone else you personally know getting a six figure income, not divided or investment return, but actual income, from a company they had nothing to do with? 6. What did you do for this $100,000 salary you earned from Bain in both 2000 and 2001? 7. If you did nothing to earn this salary, did the Bain managers violate their fiduciary duty by paying you a salary for no discernible reason? 8. Are there other companies that pay you six figures a year as earned income, not investment income, for which you have no involvement? 9. In 2002, you are listed as one of two managing members of Bain Capital Investors LLC in its annual report. What does this mean? 10. On the very day after you took over the Winter Olympics, the Boston Herald reported that "Romney said he will stay on as a part-timer with Bain, providing input on investment and key personnel decisions." Do you now contend this was factually inaccurate? TJ Walker (http://www.tjwalker.com) is a news commentator and regular contributor to Forbes.com, Daily Kos, and the Reuters Insider Network. Walker is also a USA Today, Wall Street Journal, Business Week best-selling author. A frequent network news analyst, Walker has made more than 1000 national TV and radio guest appearances on CBS, ABC, Fox News Channel, MSNBC, CNN, Bloomberg TV, Al Jazeera, NBC, Fox Business, Russia Today, HLN, TrueTV, Comedy Central, Sirius and NPR. In 2009, Walker entered the Guinness Book Of World Records for most talk show appearances ever in a 24 hour period.