vandenberg air force base

vandenberg air force base

Corona KH-1 Spy Satellite Discoverer 5 Launch 1959-08-13 USAF Vandenberg AFB Thor-Agena; JQ Music

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Launch Vehicles playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7956176032FEA321 more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/astro/space_news.html 'Two views of the launch a Thor-Agena carrying Discoverer V at 1200 hours PDT 13 August 1959 at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. - MLS static camera footage of the launch Discoverer V, using Thor 192 as the first stage. - MCU tracking camera footage of the launch and programmed flight of Thor-Agena carrying Discoverer V.' Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The film was silent. I have added music created by myself using the Reaper Digital Audio Workstation and the Independence and Proteus VX VST instrument plugins. Discoverer 6 launch: https://youtu.be/XYVmuS1ul9Q Explorer 6 launch: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0EUbmgMtO3Q http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corona_(satellite) The Corona program was a series of American strategic reconnaissance satellites produced and operated by the Central Intelligence Agency Directorate of Science & Technology with substantial assistance from the U.S. Air Force. The Corona satellites were used for photographic surveillance of the Soviet Union (USSR), the People's Republic of China, and other areas beginning in June 1959 and ending in May 1972. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thor-Agena Thor-Agena was a series of orbital launch vehicles. The rockets used Thor first stages and Agena second stages. They are thus cousins of the more famous Thor-Deltas, which founded the Delta rocket family. The first attempted launch of a Thor-Agena was in January 1959. The first successful launch was on February 28, 1959, launching Discoverer-1. http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/nmc/spacecraftDisplay.do?id=1959-005A The Discoverer 5 spacecraft consisted of a main satellite body and a separable reentry vehicle containing a recovery capsule. It was designed to test launching techniques, propulsion, communications, orbital performance, engineering, and recovery techniques. The spacecraft was successfully put into a near-polar 193 x 353 km orbit by the Thor-Agena A booster. A day after launch, on 14 August 1959, the reentry vehicle was separated from the main body and the capsule released over the Pacific Ocean for descent to Earth. However no signals were received from the capsule, presumably due to a telemetry sequencing problem, and it was not recovered. The spacecraft was a cylindrical Agena A upper stage 1.5 m in diameter, 5.85 m long with a mass including propellants of roughly 3850 kg. The mass excluding propellants was 780 kg, which included 140 kg for the reentry vehicle. The capsule section (a.k.a. bucket) of the reentry vehicle was 84 cm in diameter and 69 cm long and held a parachute, a black and white film canister, and a tracking beacon. The capsule was designed to be recovered by a specially equipped aircraft during parachute descent, but was also designed to float to permit recovery from the ocean. The Discoverer program was managed by the Advanced Research Projects Agency of the Department of Defense and the U.S. Air Force. The primary goal of the program was to develop a film-return photographic surveillance satellite to assess how rapidly the Soviet Union was producing long-range bombers and ballistic missiles and where they were being deployed, and to take photos over the Sino-Soviet bloc to replace the the U2 spyplanes. It was part of the secret Corona program which was also used to produce maps and charts for the Department of Defense and other US government mapping programs. The goal of the program was not revealed to the public at the time, it was presented as a program to orbit large satellites to test satellite subsystems and investigate the communication and environmental aspects of placing humans in space, including c...