us military

us military

SUPER POWERFUL us military CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter

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An interesting video of the us military Sikorsky CH-53E Super Stallion conducting transport operations. The Sikorsky CH-53E Super Stallion is the largest and heaviest helicopter in the United States military. As the Sikorsky S-80 it was developed from the CH-53 Sea Stallion, mainly by adding a third engine, adding a seventh blade to the main rotor and canting the tail rotor 20 degrees. It was built by Sikorsky Aircraft for the United States Marine Corps. The less common MH-53E Sea Dragon fills the United States Navy's need for long range mine sweeping or Airborne Mine Countermeasures (AMCM) missions, and perform heavy-lift duties for the Navy. Under development is the CH-53K King Stallion, which will be equipped with new engines, new composite rotor blades, and a wider cabin. Role Heavy-lift cargo helicopter Manufacturer Sikorsky Aircraft First flight 1 March 1974 Introduction 1981 Status In service Primary users United States Marine Corps United States Navy Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force Number built 234 Unit cost US$24.36 million (1992, avg. cost) Developed from Sikorsky CH-53 Sea Stallion Developed into Sikorsky CH-53K King Stallion Specifications (CH-53E) General characteristics Crew: 5: 2 pilots, 1 crew chief/right gunner, 1 left gunner, 1 tail gunner (combat crew) Capacity: 37 troops (55 with centerline seats installed) Payload: internal: 30,000 lb or 13,600 kg (external: 32,000 lb or 14,500 kg) Length: 99 ft 1/2 in (30.2 m) Rotor diameter: 79 ft (24 m) Height: 27 ft 9 in (8.46 m) Disc area: 4,900 ft² (460 m²) Empty weight: 33,226 lb (15,071 kg) Max. takeoff weight: 73,500 lb (33,300 kg) Powerplant: 3 × General Electric T64-GE-416/416A turboshaft, 4,380 shp[58] (3,270 kW) each Rotor systems: 7 blades on main rotor, 4 blades on anti-torque tail rotor Performance Maximum speed: 170 knots (196 mph, 315 km/h) Cruise speed: 150 kt (173 mph, 278 km/h) Range: 540 nmi (621 mi, 1,000 km) Ferry range: 990 nmi (1,139 mi, 1,833 km) Service ceiling: 18,500 ft (5,640 m) Rate of climb: 2,500 ft/min (13 m/s) Armament Guns: 2× .50 BMG (12.7 x 99 mm) window-mounted GAU-15/A machine guns 1× .50 BMG (12.7 x 99 mm) ramp mounted weapons system, GAU-21 (M3M mounted machine gun) Other: Chaff and flare dispensers Development[edit] Background[edit] The CH-53 was the product of the U.S. Marines' "Heavy Helicopter Experimental" (HH(X)) competition begun in 1962. Sikorsky's S-65 was selected over Boeing Vertol's modified CH-47 Chinook version. The prototype YCH-53A first flew on 14 October 1964.[1] The helicopter was designated "CH-53A Sea Stallion" and delivery of production helicopters began in 1966.[2] The first CH-53As were powered by two General Electric T64-GE-6 turboshaft engines with 2,850 shp (2,125 kW) and had a maximum gross weight of 46,000 lb (20,865 kg) including 20,000 lb (9,072 kg) in payload. Variants of the original CH-53A Sea Stallion include the RH-53A/D, HH-53B/C, CH-53D, CH-53G, and MH-53H/J/M. The RH-53A and RH-53D were used by the US Navy for mine sweeping. The CH-53D included a more powerful version of the General Electric T64 engine, used in all H-53 variants, and external fuel tanks. The CH-53G was a version of the CH-53D produced in West Germany for the German Army.[1] The US Air Force's HH-53B/C "Super Jolly Green Giant" were for special operations and combat rescue and were first deployed during the Vietnam War. The Air Force's MH-53H/J/M Pave Low helicopters were the last of the twin engined H-53s and were equipped with extensive avionics upgrades for all weather operation. H-53E[edit] In October 1967, the US Marine Corps issued a requirement for a helicopter with a lifting capacity 1.8 times that of the CH-53D that would fit on amphibious assault vessels. The US Navy and US Army were also seeking similar helicopters at the time. Before issue of the requirement Sikorsky had been working on an enhancement to the CH-53D, under the company designation "S-80", featuring a third turboshaft engine and a mo...