training day

training day

Why we should be your first choice. I have attached a video clip of a distraction / generalization training day that all dogs go through that come through our program. We Offer more than a standard obedience course. With our program you get a complete p

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Why we should be your first choice. I have attached a video clip of a distraction / generalization training day that all dogs go through that come through our program. We Offer more than a standard obedience course. With our program you get a complete package. Just training your dog sit, down, stay, Does not make your dog obedient. Obedience commands are only 25% of Obedience Training. The other 75% is Pack Structure. Setting Rules and Boundaries inside your home for your dog to follow. Establishing yourself as your dogs pack leader is the only way you will have a successful relationship with your dog. Our Obedience Training Program is that key to your success with your dog. There is nothing secretive or magical about training dogs. Good dog training is all common sense combined with a foundation based on experience and a clear understanding of the way dogs think and interact (pack structure). The key is to get the right experience. One only needs to spend a couple of hours searching the internet to understand that there are a lot of people out there who lack experience or who are basing their training opinions on poorly acquired experience. Three basic categories of dog trainers which I place on a sliding scale. The first category is the group of people who beg or bribe and lure their dogs to do something by offering a food or toy reward. These dogs never understand the meaning of “NO”. There is no distraction or corrective phase with this training. Positive Reinforcement Training Only. Don't get me wrong, I use food and toys in training, but I also use distractions and corrections. The problem with this group is that the dogs often choose not to do what's asked because they don't think the reward is not high enough in value to them. These dogs end up being pushy, dominant and often antisocial aggressive animals. These are the dogs that are turned into animal shelters as being unmanageable when in fact they act the way they do as a result of ineffective dog training. At the other end of the scale, is the second category of dog trainers. These are trainers who intimidate or force their dogs to do what they want. I call them the old school "yank and crank" trainers. They put a choke collar on a dog and force it to do everything. Most professional dog trainers use these methods because for them "time is money" and they can get a dog trained much quicker by forcing the dog to perform. The bottom line is with enough force a dog can be trained to do almost anything. The problem with yank and crank trainers is the dogs seldom like their handlers. In fact softer dogs are often afraid of their handlers. These are the dogs that tuck their tails or lay on the ground when asked to do something. These are dogs that look nervous when they are near their owners. That's because they never know when the hammer is going to fall. The problem with both categories of dog trainers is that their training produces inconsistent results along with dogs that don't like or respect their owners. You will never reach consistency in training if you don't have a good bond with your dog, or if your dog does not respect you as a pack leader. The third category of dog trainer is the where I strive to be. Category three dog trainers want to be in the middle of the other two categories. They balance in the middle but are always prepared to move one way or the other depending on what's going on in their dog training at a given moment or point in time. The third group uses motivation methods (food, toys, or praise) to take a dog through a learning phase. The most effective motivational method is called training with markers. This is where a dog actually learns the meaning of a command. Once the dog understands the meaning of a command the trainer then adds distractions to the program. A good example of this is a dog that has learned the meaning of the word “DOWN” but now must learn that “DOWN” means stay down until the handler gives a “RELEA...