the sublime

the sublime

object_load_test teaser

13h ago
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Description

Henry Hynes, 2013, javascript built in Processing The "object load test" series arose out of two things: the code written by 'Saito' that enables the abstraction of 3D Google Sketch-Up files in Processing and the idea to put 3D renders in the sky, and to suggest a certain physicality about them. I wanted to reference sculpture and painting through code, and vice versa. 'Church' is an abstraction of a 3D model of Ferwert, a 15th century German church, uploaded by a user on the Sketch-Up Warehouse. The architecture is then abstracted using an algorithm, colored red, and set against a gradient representing an evening sky. The effect is a floating geometric structure that the user can explore using arrow keys. 'Haunted House' is set to a similar backdrop (but slightly later in the evening) and features objects like armchairs, candle-holders, bookshelves, a bust looking at a floating book, a hawk, and a table, all painted perfect green. The arrow key code is manipulated to simulate confusion or fear in its "user-unfriendliness". The two 'Party Church' edits are for fun… The sound is a 30 minute clip of suburban ambient noise downloaded from YouTube. I like to think that these spaces suggest an abstracted suburban infrastructure, the sublime, and (they are certainly coded in the fashion of, anyway) the grotesque. In terms of the high and the low, where do computer graphics stand? This series is inspired by the computer generated 3D historical spaces of settings such as 'Plato's Ancient Greece' made for the Encyclopedia Brittanica CD-Rom mini games in the late 1990's and Robert Ashley's television-opera 'Perfect Lives'. "it looks like when my friend's Star Fox was corrupted" - Daniel Rossi, photographer