the message

the message

Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five featuring Melle Mel and Duke Bootee - The Message

3w ago
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Description

The Message" is a song by Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five. It was released as a single by Sugar Hill Records on July 1, 1982 and was later featured on the group's first studio album, The Message. "The Message" was the first prominent hip hop song to provide a lyrical social commentary. It took rap music from the house parties to the social platforms later developed by groups like Public Enemy, N.W.A., and Rage Against The Machine. Melle Mel said in an interview with NPR: "Our group, like Flash and the Furious Five, we didn't actually want to do the message because we was used to doing party raps and boasting how good we are and all that." It is credited as the catalyst for the conscious Hip-Hop or political sub-genre of Hip-Hop music. It is a social narrative that details the struggles and difficulties due to living in poverty in the inner-city. In addition, it embodies the distress, anger, and sadness an individual experiences when confronting these inequalities. The description of various social and economic barriers followed by the mantra "don't push me cause I'm close to the edge, I'm trying not to lose my head" exemplifies that it is not just the disparity in opportunity that is oppressive but also the emotional response that is debilitating. It is frequently referred to as the greatest record in hip hop history and was the first Hip-Hop record ever to be added to the United States' National Recording Registry of historic sound recordings. B-side "The Message" (instrumental) Released July 1, 1982 Format CD, vinyl, cassette Genre Old school hip hop, political hip hop, electro Length 7:10 Label Sugar Hill Writer(s) Ed "Duke Bootee" Fletcher Grandmaster Melle Mel Sylvia Robinson Producer Ed Fletcher Clifton "Jiggs" Chase Sylvia Robinson