the library of alexandria

the library of alexandria

The internet future of books, art, music, and video

14h ago
SOURCE  

Description

With Brewster Kahle, Tom Rennie, Bronwyn Holloway-Smith, and Rollo Wenlock. Brewster Kahle Brewster discusses the Internet Archive's goal of building the Library of Alexandria V2 - a universal, and universally accessible, repository of all human knowledge. It's technologically possible, but organisationally very, very hard - it has to be a big joint project. So how can we build music libraries together? The Internet Archive has provided space, bandwidth, and reliability for tape trading communities, the Internet Underground Music Archive, and a bunch of net labels. Most of the activity happens at the community level. By taking care of the infrastructure, the Archive allows the community to get on with what interests them. The Archive is also actively digitising at a large scale, and figuring out how to work with commercial interests. Ultimately, the key is probably working with other people. Get the technology, spread it out, and share the infrastructure and workflow. Tom Rennie Tom discusses the ongoing connection of physical and digital books, explaining the links that are necessarily maintained by the nature of how we read and what is important to us. Throughout their lives, creative works flip flop back and forth between physical and digital, and rarely settle into one for good. The transition is not lossless. The development of the media we use isn't neat or linear, as the physical keeps pushing its way into our digital media for a range of reasons, including customer needs. There are a number of challenges, including the way technology both liberates and centralises (see ebook retail); the massive genre bias in ebooks, even in self-publishing; ebooks are complex, poorly supported objects, not just because of DRM; publishers and web developers are not well connected. Bronwyn Holloway-Smith Bronwyn discusses her experiences letting parts of her artworks go, and the surprising things that have happened. 3d printable objects made for specific installations continue to live around the world, thanks to CC-licensed distribution through the Thingiverse. Works covered include "Ghosts in the form of gifts", "Pioneer City", and "Whisper down the lane". These and other works have prompted further exhibitions and responses from galleries, school kids, model-makers, and more. Rollo Wenlock Rollo discusses the proliferation and further sophistication of video. Video, as a highly human medium, humanises the web, and the future will see video more deeply integrated into all our activities. Communication, information, and entertainment will become more closely entwined, and will use data to become more ambient, persistant, and personalised. Panel discussion The panel answered questions from the audience, covering accessibility, balancing corporate and crowdsourced development, what's missing from today's archives, the biggest threat to humanity on the web, and what we'll be talking about archiving in 2020.