television station

television station

Greece: State television journalists occupy the news

34m ago
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1. M/S of inside ERT headquarters 2. SOT Giannis Milios, Syriza Member of Parliament: "Greek people think, the children of the government, that to shut down the public television is an attack against democracy, against the right to have information, against the right to free press." 3. W/S of demonstrators chanting outside of ERT headquarters 4. W/S of demonstrators gathered outside of ERT headquarters, some clapping 5. W/S of demonstrators gathered outside of ERT headquarters, music playing in the background 6. M/S of demonstrators gathered outside of ERT headquarters 7. W/S of demonstrators gathered outside of ERT headquarters 8. W/S of demonstrators walking towards the ERT headquarters 9. W/S of ERT headquarters building SCRIPT Greece: State television journalists occupy the news Journalists at Greek state television broadcaster Hellenic Broadcasting Corporation (ERT) occupied the offices of the corporation on Tuesday after government officials in Athens closed the station down, with government spokesman Simos Kedikoglou describing the channel as 'a haven of waste'. The Athens journalists' union has called a 48-hour strike to protest the action, with a large number of the broadcaster's 2,900 employees staging an angry protest against their immediate dismissal. The Greek Communist party (KKE) also offered the departing employees free use of the broadcast frequency of its television station to re-broadcast their programs. During the late night sit-in, broadcasting services for digital TV and Internet were re-established, while political leaders including Syriza's Alexis Tsipras joined the demonstration at the headquarters to express solidarity with the protesters. Syriza Member of Parliament, Giannis Milios said: "Greek people think, the children of the government, that to shut down the public television is an attack against democracy, against the right to have information, against the right to free press." ERT, which began broadcasting in 1938, is funded by a surcharge levied on domestic electricity bills. The corporation ran three television channels, four national radio stations, and several regional services. Government spokesman Kedikoglou claimed that the station will be re-launched as a smaller and more independent broadcaster, with laid-off employees able to re-apply for their old jobs. Critics say that the move was prompted by the International Monetary Fund, which had previously stated that Greece had failed to take "politically difficult measures" since its first bailout in 2010. Greece employees in the public sphere benefit from constitutional protection in most government jobs. In April, parliament passed a bill that will see up to 15,000 state employees lose their jobs by the end of 2014.