solar cells

solar cells

Nanolobes | MconneX | MichEpedia

3d ago
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In designs that mimic the texture of starfish shells, Michigan engineers have had made curved ordered crystals. Such shapes are found readily in nature, but not in a lab. Crystals engineers typically make either have facets with flat surfaces and hard angles, or are smooth but lack a repeating molecular order. The researchers call them “nanolobes.” Both the nanolobes’ shape and the way they’re made have promising applications. The geometry could potentially be useful to guide light in advanced LEDs, solar cells and nonreflective surfaces. A layer might help a material repel water or dirt. And the process used to manufacture them – organic vapor jet printing – might lend itself to 3D-printing medications that absorb better into the body and make personalized dosing possible. The principal investigator in this work is Max Shtein, associate professor of material science and engineering, macromolecular science engineering, chemical engineering and art and design. ABOUT THE PROFESSOR: Principal investigator Max Shtein (http://www.mse.engin.umich.edu/people/mshtein) is an associate professor of material science and engineering (http://www.mse.engin.umich.edu/), macromolecular science engineering (http://www.macromolecular.umich.edu/), and chemical engineering (http://www.engin.umich.edu/che) at the University of Michigan College of Engineering (http://www.engin.umich.edu/college/) and associate professor of art and design in the Penny W. Stamps School of Art & Design (http://stamps.umich.edu/about/stamps). His research areas include fundamental and applied challenges in physics and processing of organic and hybrid semiconductor materials and devices. Olga Shalev (http://www.mse.engin.umich.edu/people/mshtein/group/olga-shalev) is a doctoral student in materials science and engineering. Her research interests include vapor jet based growth of organic semiconductor thin films, thermophysical properties and crystal growth of small molecular materials. MORE: Watch additional MichEpedia videos or join the discussion at http://www.engin.umich.edu/mconnex/michepedia