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sepp blatter

Netherlands: Goal line technology finally enters European game

2d ago
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1. M/S Testing GoalRef before match 2. M/S GoalRef testing before match 3. W/S Football pitch before match 4. W/S Players walk onto pitch 5. W/S Part of stadium 6. W/S Children in front of players warming up 7. SOT: Ronald de Boer - coach and former international: "I think it's crucial. I think it can take even too long to make a decision, because for now in football it's such an easy way to make sure, 100 percent sure, if the ball is over the line or not." 8. M/S GoalRef apapratus behind goal 9. M/S A kick during a match 10. M/S The net with GoalRef technology 11. C/U GoalRef logo SCRIPT Netherlands: Goal line technology finally enters European game Goal-line technology is finally entering European football and was premiered in Amsterdam today, Saturday May 18, in response to a series of controversies in major games and tournaments. The GoalRef technology which detects whether the ball has crossed the line using magnetic devices is being used in the first game of the Copa Amsterdam tournament in a match between AFC Ajax and Borussia Monchengladbach. The Fraunhofer IIS developed GoalRef system uses a magenetic field generated by attennas attached to the goalpost and crossbar, as soon as a signal is created by the ball passing through the magenetic field, an alert is sent to the referees wristwatch and allows the official to immediately determine whether a goal has been scored or not. GoalRef is FIFA's preferred goal line technology and was used at the Club World Club, played in Japan 2012. It's advantages were seen in the final of Club Club between Sao Paulo's Corinthians and Chelsea F.C when a goal seemed to be scored by the English club, only to be immediately denied by the referee - who allowed play to continue. If the game of football should employ such technology has been a debate raging in the sport for the last decade. Issues were raised when the final of the African Cup of Nations in 2000 was decided by a dubious referee decision in a penalty shoot out. The match official denied that Nigeria's Victor Ikpeba's penalty crossed the line, when television replays showed that it had. The opponents Cameroon went on to win the penalty shoot-out and the tournament was decided, crucially, by human error. Fans of the English Premier League saw the importance of employing the technology when Manchester United beat Tottenham Hotspur despite conceding a clear goal from a stunning shot from Pedro Mendes from 55 yards - Carroll fumbled the shot, allowed it to past the line, then slapped it back out of goal - and match officials were not placed appropriately to see the clear goal that was conceded. The cost of human error became too much and FIFA began researching the technology. The technology certainly has its fans. "I think it's crucial," says Ronald de Boer, a coach and former Dutch international. "I think it can take even too long to make a decision, because for now in football it's such an easy way to make sure, 100 percent sure, if the ball is over the line or not." Critics of goal-line-technology believe elimanating the capacity of human error undermines the enigma of the game. Much opposition came through FIFA, with the President Sepp Blatter on numerous occasions dismissing the need. The apparent need for video evidence for a decision was blocked for affecting the flow of the game, employment of technology such as GoalRef and HawkEye are seen as too expensive to implement across all levels of the game. It wasn't until a goal from Frank Lampard was disallowed in the 2010 World Cup that the upper echelons of FIFA began to get serious about the technology. Leagues such as the English Premier League have decided to implement the technology, with the first game of the 2013-14 season kicking-off with the use of HawkEye - a similar product to GoalRef. Whether the World Cup will employ such technology is expected to incite fierce debate between UEFA and FIFA - with Michel Platini still vehemently opposed to the ...