seeking asylum

seeking asylum

Regime Shot and Killed a Uyghur Extremist

1mo ago
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High pressure stability maintenance policy has been ever increasing in Xinjiang; subsequently causing many more Uyghurs to try to cross the borders seeking asylum in Southeast Asian countries. Many of them have been intercepted by police from both sides. Recently, Guangxi police arrested more than 20 Uyghurs at the Vietnam border and shot one dead. Police claimed they are "religious extremists." But, how was this incident viewed by the outside world? According to the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) mouthpiece, CCTV, one religious extremist group was cracked down by police while trying to cross the Sino-Vietnam border on the evening of Dec. 21. Police shot one man dead and arrested 21. CCTV provided no specific information about where these extremists were from. BBC Chinese suspected they are Uyghurs from China's far western region of Xinjiang. World Uyghur Congress spokesman Dilshat Reshit believes these are Uyghurs who could not stand the CCP's high-handed policy and were forced to flee China, rather than so-called "religious extremists". World Uyghur Congress spokesman Alim Seytoff also appealed to the Chinese people not to trust the misleading propaganda of the CCP that aims to discredit the Uyghurs and brainwash the Chinese. Alim Seytoff: "We have seen many Uyghurs take refuge in Southeast Asian countries such as Thailand, Vietnam, Myanmar and Malaysia recently. The Chinese government claims they are all so-called "extremists", "terrorists", "separatists" and the like. But in fact we saw these people who left their land and homes are many younger generations and groups of families of husband and wife, with infants and toddlers." Uyghur Human Rights Project senior researcher Henryk Szadziewski, believed the regime has labeled this person a religious extremist in order to cover the police tracks. He also suspected Sunday's shooting death might have been an "extrajudicial killing" by Chinese authorities with excess and unreasonable force, according to RFA. In this regard, a refugee in exile in Thailand shares a similar point of view. Chinese refugee in Thailand, Tan Weichang: "This 'religious extremists' is a pocket crime with a very broad concept. It is similar to charges such as "leaking state secrets" and "picking quarrels and provoking troubles." They are very vague. The CCP has often used these charges to defeat its so-called enemy or person to its disadvantage. In recent years, many more Uyghurs have escaped the persecution by going through Laos or Myanmar to reach Thailand or elsewhere in Southeast Asia. Nearly 300 Uyghurs have been held in immigration detention camps in Thailand, according to RFA. Tan Weichang tells NTD TV that Uyghur refugees were very rare in Thailand a few years ago. But recently, the number has increased significantly. Tan Weichang: "When I was in Bangkok, I rarely heard of Uyghurs seeking refuge in Thailand. But, just recently I have already heard two cases. In particular the 100 Uyghur detainees in Thailand just a while ago. It tells me that the persecution is getting more severe. Religious suppression in Xinjiang is exacerbated. " Huang Mingan was an Indonesian Chinese who had returned to China during the anti-Chinese riots of Indonesia. The persecution from the CCP had him once again flee to Thailand. He indicates that even if the Uyghurs successfully reach Thailand, it does not guarantee their safety. Thailand is a non-member of the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees. Thus, a refugee in Thailand is not recognized or protected, but rather at risk of arrest and repatriation. Huang Mingan: "Now some (refugees) have been arrested and brought into the detention center; (The Uyghurs) arrested twice in the south. They smuggled to a hideout place in the south twice. The police also went there twice and caught them there." In a joint communique released on Dec. 24 by China's foreign ministry following a visit to Beijing by Thai Prime Minister Prayut ...