sculpture

sculpture

Monsterous art project brought our cancer patients together

45m ago
SOURCE  

Description

For the past five months, Ian has been working with more than 1,300 patients, family members, and staff at MD Anderson to create a monumental scale river dragon sculpture entitled Okoa the Wave Rider. The sculpture, a project made possible by the Arts in Medicine Program, was built entirely on site in the Main Building. You may have seen it on display, or maybe even contributed to it, in The Park. The name, “Okoa,” was selected through a vote by the patients and families who helped create the dragon. It’s a Swahili word that means “rescue, save, redeem or deliver.” It’s a fitting name, as Okoa was built to demonstrate the effectiveness of community art in bringing joy and relief into the cancer center. The sculpture and the art table where patients, families and staff joined together to make it were actually both works of art. What make the dragon so beautiful are the sculpture and the time shared in its creation, the simple fact that these thousands of people were excited to contribute, to take time out of their day, to stop and laugh and draw or paint, to share their stories with each other around the table. Since its inception in 2010, the Arts in Medicine Program has focused on large-scale, long-term creative collaborations with patients and families undergoing treatment at MD Anderson Children’s Cancer Hospital. But this project was the first to bring together patients, families and staff from the entire hospital. Learn more about the Arts in Medicine Program -- http://www.mdanderson.org/patient-and-cancer-information/care-centers-and-clinics/childrens-cancer-hospital/support-programs/children-s-cancer-hospital-support-programs-arts-in-medicine.html Everyone visiting MD Anderson was invited to participate in a range of art projects that contributed to the dragon. They did everything from coloring pre-cut dragon scale templates, to painting large format watercolor paintings that were cut and used to make the water, to making and water-coloring paper flowers. Patients and family members were encouraged to visit, and our nurses, doctors and child life specialists often brought them to the temporary art studio so they could participate.