president lincoln

president lincoln

Erin Carlson Mast Takes Us Inside Lincoln's Cottage at Soldiers' Home

5d ago
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For American history buffs, there’s nothing quite like visiting the home of a former president. And when that president is one of the nation’s most revered and beloved, as is Abraham Lincoln, it’s especially meaningful to meander through his summer home in Washington, DC. David Bruce Smith and Hope Katz Gibbs were thrilled to sit down for an interview with Erin Carlson Mast, executive director of President Lincoln’s Cottage at The Soldiers’ Home, which stands just 3.5 miles from the White House. In this podcast interview, you’ll learn: -How Lincoln travelled to and from the Cottage -Why he once met visitors in his bed slippers -And you’ll discover five things parents can do to make learning about history fun for their children. Plus, don’t miss the fun facts about Lincoln’s life to discuss tonight at the dinner table: 1. Lincoln was the only president to have a patent. He invented a device to free steamboats that ran aground. 2. He practiced law without a degree. He had about 18 months of formal schooling. 3.He wanted women to have the vote in 1836. He was a suffragette before it was fashionable. 4. Lincoln established Thanksgiving as a national holiday. 5. He loved oysters. 6. Grave robbers were foiled in 1876 when they tried to steal Lincoln’s body. 7. He was the first president with a beard. 8. Lincoln was shot on Good Friday. 9. Lincoln was photographed with John Wilkes Booth at his second inauguration. 10. The suit that Lincoln died in was made by Brooks Brothers. 11. Lincoln’s assassin, John Wilkes Booth, had a brother who saved the life of Lincoln’s son on a New Jersey train platform. For more information and insights into President Lincoln, visit LincolnCottage.org The Grateful American™ Series includes: The Grateful American™ Radio Show on the Inkandescent Radio Network features interviews about historical figures (George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, etc.) with the chief executives of the nation’s presidential homes, historians, and other experts: InkandescentRadio.com. A TV series on YouTube, public access, and national TV stations. The Grateful American™ Guidebooks: Features insights from the leaders of the presidential homes, and interactive exercises that explore, engage, and help readers develop an interest in American history. The Grateful American™ Events: Dovetails with and promoting the events-in-progress currently going on at each of the nation’s top presidential homes. An interactive website: Students post art, photos, writing, music, and other creative works about what excites them about American history. About David Bruce Smith Author and publisher David Bruce Smith is the creator of The Grateful American™ Series, an interactive multimedia program that is focused on restoring enthusiasm for American history in children—and adults, too. A graduate of The George Washington University with a bachelor’s degree in American Literature, and a master’s in journalism from New York University, Smith has spent decades as a real estate executive and the Editor-in-Chief/ Publisher of Crystal City magazine. He is also the author of 11 books, including his most recent, American Hero: John Marshall, Chief Justice of the United States. For more information, visit davidbrucesmith.com. The History of Lincoln Cottage In 1862, Abraham Lincoln and his family were invited to stay in a Gothic-Revival “cottage” on the grounds of the Soldier’s Home. Located in Washington, D.C., the Cottage had been originally built for banker George W. Riggs in 1842, but the federal government purchased the estate in 1851 to found a home for retired and disabled veterans. The Cottage served as Lincoln’s family residence for a quarter of his presidency during the summers of 1862, 1863 and 1864, and it is where he was living when he developed his Emancipation Proclamation. The historic significance of the Soldiers’ Home was officially recognized in 1974, when four buildings built before the Civil War, ...