pirates of the caribbean

pirates of the caribbean

Pirates of the Caribbean Talking Jolly Roger Skull

1d ago
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Description

I know most people who will view these videos will be friends or other people I sent here to see them. However, if you come across these videos and take the time to watch them, I'd really like to hear what you think! I spent a lot of time, energy and passion to create this. Read on to learn about it. It's kind of lengthy but you can skip around to get the gist of it. So this project is my take on the talking Jolly Roger Skull that hangs above the drops in both versions of Pirates of the Caribbean at Disneyland and Disney World, which plays a spiel warning riders to hold on and keep their hands and arms in during the drops, lest they get attacked by pirates. I spent about 6 months off and on working on this project. It's impossible to tell exactly how many hours were spent actually working on it, but I'd put it at near 200 man hours, if not more. Everything you see was created by me, except for a few obvious things such as the skull itself (got it off eBay, white like a natural skull and I painted it with various colors to achieve a decayed look). The hat is from a Halloween store. The lantern is an Ikea votive candle holder which was originally silver. Inside it are two modules out of LED flameless candles. I took them apart, and wired them up to 5VDC (they run on 4.5VDC batteries). I changed the color of one LED to red in place of the usual yellow to create a more realistic fire effect inside the lantern. The gun is actually from Disneyland park, and is a souvenir that is created by Parris Replicas. It was originally bright orange and green. The handle is wooden and was therefore a bit heavy for a servo to operate so I hollowed it out from the back with a dremel to lighten it, and allow for the LEDs and smoke tubing to be installed. The whole unit is mounted on a solid piece of wood, which I then covered with strips of thin veneer cut to look like planks, and then painted and stained. Carpet nails are perfect replicas of the nails you might expect to have seen back in the 16th century! The rope surrounding the project is old hemp rope from a theatre that was being tossed. I roughed it up, burned it and painted it to make it look old. It does not actually support anything. Attached to the back of it is airline cable mounted into the project to support it when it hangs. Enough about the exterior. The interior is where the details are. The movement is controlled by a device called the "Mini Maestro," made by a company called Pololu Robotics out of Las Vegas (http://www.pololu.com). The device is an RC servo controller. It is programmed through their software on a PC, and can then run itself independent of any other computers. It is similar to an Arduino for those who are familiar with it. The audio is produced by a module from a Canadian company called BigDawgGreetings. It is actually designed for greeting cards and the such, but has a bit better quality and capability than the basic devices you find in greeting cards at Hallmark. The device is hooked up to a computer via USB and can then be loaded with audio. The playback is fairly quiet, so it is boosted through a basic computer speaker amplifier. Everything except for the amp is running off of 5VDC (it runs on 7.5VAC strangely). I ran 110VAC into the back of the device via an extension cord. Instead of taking the power supplies apart, I was able to simply plug them into the cord inside the unit and then run them to two banks of power pins to output to the appropriate devices. The smoke from the gun is created by an aerosol smoke product called "Fantasy FX," by a company called "CITC" (http://www.citcfx.com). I'm glad I found this product, as I was having trouble coming up with a way to create the smoke. Ideas ranged from CO2 cartridges (from airsoft guns), to a homemade miniature smoke machine using an air pump, and copper pipe wrapped around a soldering iron). The smoke is activated by the innerds of a bathroom automat...