panic attack

panic attack

Panic Attack Relief - The Best Strategies For Coping With the Fear

4d ago
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http://www.PanicNoMore.net When you suffer from PTSD, you may experience a wide variety of symptoms. When something triggers you, you may feel your heart pounding, your palms sweating, your stomach in knots, and have trouble breathing. You know you are in a safe place, so you don't understand what's happening. These are symptoms of a panic attack, or the quick rise of intense fear and anxiety. Panic attack symptoms can include sweating, shaking, nausea, lightheadedness, difficulty breathing, chills or hot flash, chest pain or discomfort or tightness, the need to escape, the feeling of imminent danger, and fear of losing control. Naturally, panic attacks can be very scary, but knowing as much as you can about them will help. You may feel lonely and think no one understands what you are experiencing. In fact, you're not alone. Panic attacks are very common in adults and children. You may try to avoid people and places to hide your panic attacks. But engaging friends and family will help you develop a support network. You may think that no treatment can help you overcome your anxiety. However, panic attacks are very treatable with highly effective therapies and medications. People choose different paths for treatment, but recovery is possible. Like panic attacks, good treatments are available for PTSD, too. The first step is to understand your anxiety, symptoms, triggers, and treatments. You can learn skills and techniques to overcome panic and PTSD. The website of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA), www.ADAA.org, has many resources to help you. Learn to recognize symptoms of the anxiety disorders PTSD, GAD, OCD, and panic disorder, and depression, and understand the effective treatments Download resources, including brochures; podcasts and videos by experts; tips for selecting a doctor or therapist and helping a family member; find referrals—and much more Consider this and other self-help books: Panic Away Program You may notice that your anxiety affects you and everyone around you. Your family and friends may feel helpless, afraid that they may do or say the wrong thing. Share these ABC's for those who want to help and support you: Ask how you can help. Acknowledge that everyone experiences anxiety differently, and that traumatic injuries are often invisible. Be encouraging, and learn about the disorder and its treatment Consult a professional for advice on how best to provide support With practice, you can learn how to manage your symptoms and your anxiety. See more at: http://www.PanicNoMore.net