paid off

paid off

France: Tens of thousands march against austerity in Paris

3h ago
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1. W/S Protesters marching 2. W/S Protesters gathered in Paris 3. M/S Protesters 4. W/S Protesters marching in street 5. W/S Protesters marching in street 6. SOT Jean-Luc Melenchon (speaking French): "The more we try to pay off the debt, the less likely it will be for us to do so, and it will get worse for us." 7. W/S Protesters marching in street 8. M/S Brooms held in the air 9. W/S Protesters in street 10. SOT Jean-Luc Melenchon (speaking French): "We declare that all the pains that we inflict on the people are useless, cruel and saddistic, because they lead nowhere." 11. W/S Protesters human barrier 12. M/S Protester holding up sign 13. W/S Protesters walking in street 14. W/S Hand holding roses 15. W/S Protesters holding banner 16. W/S Protesters holding up flags 17. W/S Protesters gathered in Paris SCRIPT France: Tens of thousands march against austerity in Paris Marking almost a year since the election of French President Francois Hollande, approximately 30,000 left-wing demonstrators gathered in Paris to attend an anti-austerity protest called by Front de Gauche (FdG) leader Jean-Luc Melenchon. Beginning at Place de la Bastille, protesters affiliated with Front de Gauche, Parti Communiste and the Socialist Party gathered, many carried mops and broomsticks, symbolising their hopes of "brushing away" France's current government. In support of his belief that other European nation's debts should not be paid off Maelenchon said, "The more we try to pay off the debt, the less likely it will be for us to do so, and it will get worse for us," he also said, "We declare that all the pains that we inflict on the people are useless, cruel and saddistic, because they lead nowhere." Melenchon has stressed that it is not his intention to "force Francois Hollande out before the end of his term". He promotes ideas of sharing the wealth and abolishing social insecurity, reclaiming power from banks and financial markets and changing the course of globalisation. With unemployment in France currently standing at 3.2 million, the highest it's been since 1977, many left-wing supporters have begun to question the president's economic policies. Hollande has been widely criticised by the left, including supporters of his own party, for failing to oppose German Chancellor Anegla Merkel's suggested auserity measures. Hollande's public approval rating has almost halved since he was elected, now standing at just 29 percent, according to pollster CSA.