osservatore romano

osservatore romano

Gospel of Jesus mention his wife

1w ago
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Anonymous private collector known only as Gomer reveals fragment of a Gospel of Jesus mentioning his wife. Harvard University prof explain ancient papyrus. This week, the existence of a papyrus fragment containing evidence that Jesus was married was announced in the New York Time. This explosive story has already been blocked by FaceBook, which won't allow posting of the New York Times story. The papyrus promises to cause extraordinary controversy in coming weeks. Inevitably, its authenticity will be denied by the forces of entrenched belief. The fragment is already being questioned, but most experts, including Harvard professor of divinity Karen King, believe it to be authentic. Tricia McCannon, the author of Jesus: the Explosive Story of the 30 Lost Years and the Ancient Mystery Religions, discusses the meaning and implications of the fragment with William Henry. The "Gospel of Jesus' Wife" is the name given to the text on a papyrus fragment with writing in Egyptian Coptic that includes the words, "Jesus said to them, 'my wife...'". The text on the fragment is alleged to be a fourth century translation of what is said to be "a gospel probably written in Greek in the second half of the second century." Professor Karen L. King (who announced the existence of the papyrus in 2012) and her colleague AnneMarie Luijendijk named the fragment the "Gospel of Jesus's Wife" for reference purposes but have since acknowledged the name was controversial.[note 1] King has insisted that the fragment, "should not be taken as proof that Jesus, the historical person, was actually married". Luijendijk and fellow papyrologist Roger Bagnall authenticated the papyrus with Luijendijk suggesting it would have been impossible to forge. However, the Vatican's semi-official newspaper, L'Osservatore Romano, has claimed the gospel is a "very modern forgery". A number of independent scholars have since provided evidence to support this view, suggesting the papyrus includes textual mistakes (a typographical error) identical to those made only in a particular on-line modern iteration of corresponding texts.