orbital sciences

orbital sciences

Russia: Vintage Soviet engines take US rocket to the stars

1w ago
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1. M/S Head of Kuznetsov Design Bureau's rocket engines building depatment and his colleague examine rocket engine 2. W/S Kuznetsov Design Bureau rocket engine building complex 3. M/S Engineer runs equipment test 4. C/U Inner rocket engine's part in work 5. M/S Inner rocket engine's part in work 6. SOT Alexander Ivanov, head of the rocket engines department (in Russian): "I'll point out again that this engine that was developed many, many, many years ago is up to today's international rocket engineering standards, in terms of its technical parameters, its engine weight and fuel consumption." 7. M/S Still of rocket engine 8. SOT Alexander Ivanov, head of the rocket engines department (in Russian): "Yes, it is a massive success. After this test flight, the Americans will run regular cargo deliveries to the ISS. We know that they're planning to work further on other spacecrafts, so we can say that this engine has a future both in Russia and the USA, thanks to this successful test flight." 9. C/U Still of rocket engine 10. M/S Engineer runs equipment test 11. M/S Head of Samara rocket engines building centre and his colleagues talking SCRIPT Russia: Vintage Soviet engines take US rocket to the stars NASA confirmed the first successful launch of the Orbital Sciences Antares rocket on Monday, after the spacecraft lifted off from Wallops Island, Virginia, delivering a dummy payload into orbit 158 miles above the Earth. The Antares relies on a kerosene and liquid oxygen first-stage engine, the Aerojet AJ-26, which is a refitted edition of the NK-33, an engine originally designed by the Kuznetsov Design Bureau for the Soviet N-1 moon rocket. The engines were imported from Russia to the US, before going through a modification process that added US electronics compatibility and upgraded the steering system. Alexander Ivanov, head of the rocket engines department at the Kuznetsov Design Bureau, said: "I'll point out again that this engine that was developed many, many, many years ago is up to today's international rocket engineering standards, in terms of its technical parameters, its engine weight and fuel consumption." Mr. Ivanov also commented on a successful launch of the Antares: "Yes, it is a massive success. After this test flight, the Americans will run regular cargo deliveries to the ISS (International Space Station). We know that they're planning to work further on other aircraft, so we can say that this engine has a future both in the US and Russia, all thanks to this successful test flight." The NK-33 was designed to power a heavy lift rocket that could rival NASA's Saturn V lift capacity. While the design still has among the highest thrust-to-weight ratio of any Earth-launchable rocket, the N-1 programme was cancelled by the USSR in 1976, causing the technology to be mothballed until retrieved for use in Orbital Science's commercial cargo lift vehicle. Orbital Science is in line to receive a contract worth $1.9 billion (€1.45bn) to resupply the ISS once it meets NASA requirements.