on land

on land

Brian Eno | Ambient 4 - On Land | Whole Album HD

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Brian Eno | Ambient 4 - On Land | Whole Album HD I don't own any rights to the music, I'm just a fan of Brian Eno. Playlist: 1. Lizard Point (Eno, Michael Beinhorn, Axel Gros, Bill Laswell) 00:00 2. The Lost Day 04:34 3. Tal Coat 13:40 4. Shadow 19:10 5. Lantern Marsh 22:15 6. Unfamiliar Wind (Leeks Hills) 27:45 7. A Clearing 33:10 8. Dunwich Beach, Autumn, 1960 37:20 Ambient 4: On Land is a 1982 album by British ambient musician Brian Eno. It was the final edition in Eno's ambient series, which began in 1978 with Music for Airports. On Land is arguably the "darkest" of Eno's four as-titled Ambient albums and could be said to be an archetypal example of dark ambient, though it does possess a wistful, meandering, longing, organic quality as well. It is a mixture of synthesizer-based notes, nature/animal recordings, and a complex array of other sounds, most of which were unused, collected recordings from previous albums and the sessions that created them. As Eno explained, "... the making of records such as On Land involved feeding unheard tape into the mix, constant feeding and remixing, subtracting and "composting". Eno actually found, in the three-year process of making the album, that the synthesizer came to be of "limited usefulness" and that his "instrumentation shifted gradually through electro-mechanical and acoustic instruments towards non-instruments like pieces of chain and sticks and stones ... I included not only recordings of rooks, frogs and insects, but also the complete body of my own earlier work". Despite the music's dark leanings, it is in a sense still highly "ambient" in that the tracks tend to blend into each other and thus fulfill all of Eno's original expectations of what the term means. Nevertheless, there is still room for the occasional surprise, such as Jon Hassell's recognisable effect-laden trumpet in "Shadow". Eno, cognizant of the deeper aural qualities, said, "On the whole, On Land is quite a disturbed landscape: some of the undertones deliberately threaten the overtones, so you get the pastoral prettiness on top, but underneath there's a dissonance that's like an impending earthquake".