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Youths threaten to leave the country if President is re-elected

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1. Central square of the Belarus capital Minsk 2. Streets scenes 3. People on the streets 4. People walking past 5. Close up of Belarus Popular Front opposition movement flag 6. Young people standing by the table 7. Close up of newspapers 8. Children looking at the newspapers 9. Minsk street 10. Dmitry Kasperovich, member of the Youth Front, the youth branch of the Popular Front 11. Dmitry holding a book 12. SOUNDBITE: (Belarussian) Dmitry Kasperovich: "The Popular Front activists urge us to stay calm and to continue our fight, even after the elections. It's true, we shall continue our fight; we have enough people and will do so. But it is also true that many young people will be very disappointed." 13. Newspapers with Lukashenko's photo 14. SOUNDBITE: (Belarussian) Dmitry Kasperovich: "Many young people see no position for themselves in Belarus because few believe that the opposition can ever win; it's true. Young people have harder times now because we have tasted democracy already - in 1991 to 1994 when we had freedom and democracy. And then all those Soviet things started to come back. We see all that and consider leaving this country and moving abroad." 15. Belarussian flag 16. Dmitry's mother, Tatyana, bringing tea 17. Close up of pot 18. Dmitry and Tatyana drinking tea 19. SOUNDBITE: (Belarussian) Tatyana Kasperovich: "Free, independent, democratic Belarus. The one that has friendly relations with the rest of the world - not just with Russia. That's what I wish for my son, for his future." 20. Various of people buying groceries and queuing at the local market STORYLINE: If Belarus strongman, President Alexander Lukashenko, gets to keep his power after elections on September 9th, disaffected young people say it could drive them to leave the country. Dmitry Kasperovich, a 20-year old student of the Minsk Institute of Culture says that he and many of his schoolmates would be likely to take that course because of the lack of democracy. Lukashenko has headed this impoverished former Soviet republic of 10 million people with an iron hand for seven years, shutting down opposition media and jailing political opponents. But he is still popular in Belarus for his attempt to hold together the Soviet-era social safety net, and is widely expected to win Sunday's election over his opponents, Vladimir Goncharik, who leads a broad based coalition and who backs democratic reform and the centrist politician Sergei Gaidukevich, who wants liberal economic reforms. A former collective farm manager and border guard officer, Lukashenko extended his original five-year term by two years in 1996 through a referendum most Western governments refused to recognise. But Dmitry Kasperovich says Lukashenko is leading Belarus nowhere and calls him "a dictator". A long-time member of the opposition Youth Front, a branch of the Popular Front of Belarus, Dmitry says he had enough of Lukashenko's repressive ways. Youth Front members are vocal protesters of the regime and their unsanctioned demonstrations often end up in scuffles with riot police. Dmitry's mother Tatyana says she supports her son's struggle. She adds that she wants her son to live in a democratic country. But on Sunday's elections, the voices of people like Dmitry and his mother are likely to be overwhelmed by those of Lukashenko's supporters. The Belarus leader still can count on his power base in rural areas and is widely expected to retain power. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/c9e6a51862f6bf89baed032ccaa9f656 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork