moon landings

moon landings

MOON LANDING HOAX- TOP 10 REASONS

5d ago
SOURCE  

Description

MOON LANDING HOAX- TOP 10 REASONS SUBSCRIBE HERE: https://www.youtube.com/user/themrkatt420 http://youtu.be/qQyS-5ZmO_E SUNDAY,JUNE 21,2015 JUNE 21ST,2015 6/21/15 6/21/2015 Published on JUNE 21,2015 The Moon landing conspiracy theories claim that some or all elements of the Apollo program and the associated Moon landings were hoaxes s taged by NASA with the aid of other organizations. The most notable claim is that the six manned landings (1969–72) were faked and that twelve Apollo astronauts did not actually walk on the Moon. Various groups and individuals have made such conspiracy claims since the mid-1970s. Conspiracy theorists (henceforth conspiracists) claim that NASA and others knowingly misled the public into believing the landings happened, by manufacturing, tampering with, or destroying evidence including photos, telemetry tapes, radio and TV transmissions, Moon rock samples, and even some key witnesses. Much third-party evidence for the landings exists, and detailed rebuttals to the hoax claims have been made. Since the late 2000s, high-definition photos taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) of the Apollo landing sites have captured the lander modules and the tracks left by the astronauts. In 2012, images were released showing five of the six Apollo missions' American flags erected on the Moon still standing (the Apollo 11 flag was accidentally blown over by the takeoff rocket's exhaust, but is still there). Conspiracists have managed to sustain public interest in their theories for more than 40 years, despite the rebuttals and third-party evidence. Opinion polls taken in various locations have shown that between 6% and 20% of Americans and 28% of Russians surveyed believe that the manned landings were faked. Even as late as 2001, the Fox television network broadcast Conspiracy Theory: Did We Land on the Moon? which claimed NASA faked the first landing in 1969 to win the Space Race. Marcus Allen – British publisher of Nexus, who said photographs of the lander would not prove that the United States put men on the Moon, and "Getting to the Moon really isn't much of a problem – the Russians did that in 1959. The big problem is getting people there." He suggests that NASA sent robot missions because radiation levels in outer space would be deadly.Another variant on this is the idea that NASA and its contractors did not recover quickly enough from the Apollo 1 fire, and so all the early Apollo missions were faked, with Apollos 14 or 15 being the first real mission. William L. Brian – a nuclear engineer who self-published a book in 1982, Moongate: Suppressed Findings of the U.S. Space Program, in which he disputes the Moon's surface gravity. James M. Collier (d. 1998) – American journalist and writer, producer of the video Was It Only a Paper Moon? (1997). Milton William Cooper (1943–2001) – was an American conspiracy theorist and author. He believed that all of the Apollo missions to the Moon were actually carefully rehearsed productions that were then filmed in large sound stages. James H. Fetzer – retired American philosophy professor and conspiracy theorist. On May 2, 2013, Dr. Fetzer was interviewed by Dr. Sterling Harwood. Fetzer defended his conspiracist views that all six lunar landings were hoaxes. David Groves – works for Quantech Image Processing. He examined the photo of Aldrin emerging from the lander and said he can pinpoint when a spotlight was used. Using the focal length of the camera's lens and an actual boot, he allegedly calculated, using ray-tracing, that the spotlight is between 24 to 36 centimetres (9.4 to 14.2 in) to the right of the camera. This matches with the sunlit part of Armstrong's spacesuit. Clyde Lewis – radio talk show host. Philippe Lheureux – French author of Lumières sur la Lune. An English language edition was published in 2003, Moon Landings: Did NASA Lie? He said that astronauts did land on the Moon, but to stop other states ...