medical school

medical school

How To Deal With Rejection

3d ago
SOURCE  

Description

Welcome to Hard Talk. I'm Isaiah. You're here for the hard truth and I'm here to give it to you. Stop handling rejection poorly. Instead, starting handling it like a champ. How do you do that? In college, I had to take a big exam called the MCAT exam. It was to get into medical school. It was a very difficult test that people would study months, even years for. I was really nervous, and I signed up for one of these courses. It was an 8 week course you could take in a group setting to learn how to take the test better. Of course, I am horrible at learning in group settings. I do very, very poorly in a classroom setting when it comes to learning. I took the course, and I took the test, and I bombed it completely. I got a score so low that I wouldn't have gotten into any medical school. I felt a very deep sense of rejection. I wanted to blame other people. I blamed the course. I said the people at the school I was at should have trained me better, but really it was my fault. Then once I accepted that it was my fault, I became angry, and I rose up against this sense of rejection by, guess what, wanting to get into medical school even more. I was rejected by this, and this sense of rejection made me want it even more. This is a mistake that a lot of us fall into. We get rejected by something, and we go after it even more without evaluating whether or not we really want it in the first place. After this rejection, I took the test again. This time I learned on my own. I scored very well, but a few months later I realized I didn't want to go to medical school. I was actually more interested in doing cancer research. I was more interested in business. I really regretted the fact that I didn't think about this before taking the test, before investing all the time and money into the process of getting into medical school. Again, this is something that a lot of people do. They get rejected by something, and without evaluating whether or not it's what they really wanted, they go after it even harder. This is a big waste of time. This is the first thing you need to stop doing if you want to start handling rejection like a champ. Studies show that when you get rejected by something, most people want it even more. We all have that one person that rejected us, or that institution, or that group that rejected us, and secretly, on the inside, we want it even more, and so we spend a lot of time and a lot of emotional energy thinking about it, being angry about it, even trying to get access to it again in the future. This is a mistake. Don't do that. Instead, sit back and evaluate whether or not you wanted it in the first place, whether or not it's right for you in the first place, and then you can move forward from there. The second thing is a lot of us tend to choose evasion over transformation when we get rejected. Now, when you rejected, the first thing that you're going to want to do is you're going to want to evade reality. It wasn't your fault that you were rejected. It's somebody else's fault. If you're trying to get into an organization, or you're trying to get somebody to like you, it's their fault. They have a problem, not you. You're evading reality. A better strategy is transformation. Learn from the experience. You got rejected, that's fine. Don't blindly want it more. Don't get bitter and evade reality, instead, get better. Learn from it, transform and channel your energies into something better. Channel them into what you really, really want. The final thing is realize that frustration, rejection are your best friends. Pain is a powerful motivator. The key is to turn pain into productive action. I've heard it said before that frustration is just a sign that you're about to have a breakthrough. When you get rejected, use that to energize you to have that breakthrough, to learn what you really want, to reflect, to learn again, and to move forward to be successful. If you do these things you'll stop being used by rej...