john jay

john jay

Affirmative Action Proponents Beside Themselves over SCOTUS Ruling

19h ago
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By a vote of six to two on Tuesday, the Supreme Court upheld the state of Michigan's voter initiative which banned the use of racial preferences in the admissions process for state universities. The ruling is widely seen as a companion to an earlier Court decision concerning the University of Texas' inclusion of race among the criteria they consider when evaluating a prospective student. The Court determined at the time, by seven to one, to send the case back to lower courts for review which many interpreted as an acknowledgement that the Court could not invalidate racial preferences in schools' admissions processes. Then, the Court decided that racial preferences are permissible in states that want them. Today, the Court ruled that states that do not want racial preferences are free to ban them. But what would seem to be a narrow ruling which only affects college admissions has sweeping political implications, according to the panel assembled on CNN to discuss the ruling. George Washington University Law School professor Jonathan Turley thought that the ruling provides states with a framework in which they can do away with racial preferences on a broader level than merely public university admissions. But John Jay College Law School professor Gloria Browne-Marshall foresaw consequences resulting from this ruling which could be far more sinister. "Now, we're in a situation in which, if the majority rules, how is that going to affect any minority group?" Browne-Marshall asked. "I mean, it's opened a Pandora's Box on a majority ruling on the rights of minorities via the amendment of the state constitution."