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6 Hard Truths Every Job Seeker Should Know U.S.News , World Report LP

1d ago
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To find success in your , you can't have any false assumptions. Too often, talented people find themselves upended because they were surprised about something they didn't know or expect. Here are six things you should keep in mind throughout your job hunt:1. You need to have the necessary skills and experience to get a job. I would have loved that job and could have figured out how to do it with some training and help along the way. Employers hire people because they are convinced those hires already have the skills and experience to do a job well. That doesn't mean you can't make a significant career change. But no matter the circumstance, you need to somehow demonstrate a strong basis of relevant skills and experience upon which a hiring manager can predict your success. 2. Just because you have the required skills and experience doesn't mean you will get the job. From an employer's standpoint, the is about much more than matching candidate skills and experience with a job opening's stated requirements. They also carefully consider that elusive quality called fit. While it isn't a very satisfying reason to hear when you are rejected, fit can include personality, temperament, career progression and a host of other legitimate elements. 3. You will likely be asked the salary question in your first conversation. Be prepared for it. Rather than fumbling or becoming rattled, give a respectful answer that highlights a current or recent compensation level. Make it clear that you understand that the salary in this job will be different because the role, environment, cost of living and other factors will be different. Then, quickly deflect the conversation back to talking about the value you offer rather than the cost you represent as a new hire. 4. Employers are interested in your key accomplishments and how you attained them -- not your job description. You can pretty much assume that serious candidates for a given role will all have histories of more or less similar responsibilities. When you begin bullet points on with Responsible for... you lump yourself in with the rest of the candidates and provide no reason why your background is superior to theirs. As an alternative, use a CAR -- challenge, action, result -- statement. Explain one of your responsibilities, and then highlight what you actually did and what value resulted from your actions. Here's an example:Challenge: Grow and transform a fallow sales territory with few accounts into a vibrant and consistent revenue stream.