isle of man

isle of man

manx gp classic tt 2015

1d ago
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practice cbr600rr #44 dynamo HONDA CBR600RR #44 The Manx Grand Prix motorcycle races are held on the Isle of Man TT Course (or 'Mountain Circuit') every year for a two-week period, usually spanning the end of August and early September. The 'MGP' or 'Manx' (as it is more commonly known) is considered to be the amateur rider's alternative to the Isle of Man TT Races held in May and June. The event also differs from the TT in that it does not cater for sidecars. The event consists of six four-lap races of the 60.70 km (37.72 mi) circuit[1] which begins at the TT Grandstand in Douglas, the Island's capital. The separate classes are the Newcomers Class, Lightweight/Ultra Lightweight Class, Junior Class, Senior Class and the Junior/Lightweight and Senior Classic races for older machines ('Classics').The MGP began in 1923 as the 'Manx Amateur Road Races' or MARC. The MARC was held until 1930 when it was renamed the Manx Grand Prix. Problems were encountered initially over the definition of an 'Amateur' and indeed the first rules were extensive and open to various interpretations. Nowadays, many riders who have achieved success in the MGP move on to race in the TT but regulations prevent them from re-entering 'The Manx' unless they wish to do so on Classic machinery. Chris Palmer (former British 125cc champion) and the late Richard Britton both followed this route in 2005 aboard Manx Nortons. In 1989 Gloria Clark became the first woman to race in the MGP, a full 66 years after it began. In 1991 she went on to gain an entry into the Guinness Book Of Records for being the fastest lady on the TT Circuit. In 2009, 20 years after Gloria Clark became the first woman to race in the MGP, Carolynn Sells became the first woman to win a race on the Snaefell Mountain Course during the 2009 Manx Grand Prix. Carolynn also gained entry into the Guinness World Records in honour of this achievement. The MGP is organised by the Manx Motor Cycle Club (MMCC) based on the rules and regulations of the Auto-Cycle Union (ACU) which govern most British Motorsport Events.