henry kissinger

henry kissinger

Archive tapes show Nixon wanted to use nuclear bomb in Vietnam

1d ago
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NOTE: AUDIO ON TAPES IS MUFFLED 1. Wide shot of National Archives, College Park Maryland 2. Pan of dozens of boxes containing Nixon documents 3. SOUNDBITE (English) Video of tape meter, audio of U.S. President Richard Nixon and National Security Adviser Henry Kissinger: Nixon: "I'd rather use the nuclear bomb." Kissinger: "That, I think, would just be too much." Nixon: "The nuclear bomb. Does that bother you?" Kissinger: (bad mumbling audio) Nixon: "I just want you to think big, for Christ's sake." 4. File footage of Kissinger and Nixon walking out of the White House 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Video of tape meter, audio of U.S. President Richard Nixon "If we lose Vietnam and the summit, there is no way the election can be saved." 6. Close up of black and white photo of Nixon 7. Washington Post headline "President admits Withholding Data. Tapes show he approved cover-up." 8. Various file of people watching news that Nixon is resigning with shot of paper "Nixon resigns." 9. SOUNDBITE (English) Richard Nixon, former US President "I shall resign the presidency effective at noon tomorrow." 10. Washington Post headline "Nixon resigns" 11. Nixon leaves the White House on helicopter STORYLINE: Tapes released at the National Archive on Thursday reveal U.S. President Richard Nixon considered using a nuclear bomb against Vietnam weeks before he ordered an escalation in hostilities. Nixon's suggestion, buried in 500 hours of tape recordings, was quickly shot down by then national security adviser Henry Kissinger. Nixon's idea came during a discussion with Kissinger about options for stepping up the war effort in an April 25, 1972, conversation in the Executive Office Building. The following month, Nixon ordered the biggest escalation of the war since 1968. The conversations were in the archives' largest-ever release of Nixon tapes. The material covered mostly the first six months of 1972, including everything from Nixon's trip to China to the early days after the Watergate break-in. The archives now has made public about 1,700 of the 3,700 hours of conversations Nixon taped. Most of the segments relating to Watergate had been previously released, but the new tapes contain additional conversations and missing excerpts of other conversations. The public now can hear the full context of the "smoking gun" snippet, which revealed that Nixon considered using the CIA to derail the FBI's investigation of the Watergate break-in. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/30521e6b002bb207229898cf069e0c91 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork