friedrich engels

friedrich engels

The bloody history of communism (Harun Yahya)

1w ago
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The 20th century was the bloodiest in history. 250 million people died in wars, mass slaughter and political murders. The ideology known as "communism" bears the greatest responsibility for this terrible savagery. This is an ideology that promises so-called equality and justice, but which brings with it only bloodshed, death and fear. In this film, we shall be examining the bloody century of communism, and seeing the terrible misery this ideology inflicted on humanity. It will be impossible for the world to avoid similar tragedies in the future unless it learns from the past. GENERIC (PART 1 -- FROM MARX TO STALIN) THE FOUNDATIONS OF COMMUNIST IDEOLOGY It was the middle of the 19th century. Two German philosophers living in England were trying to formulate an ideology that would rock the world. The first time they revealed their ideas was in the Communist manifesto, which had been published some time before. One of these two philosophers was Karl Heinrich Marx, the other Friedrich Engels. These two believed in a philosophy known as materialism, which claims that nothing exists apart from matter. Actually, materialism was an ancient dogma which had been put forward by the Greek thinker Democritus. During the French Revolution, however, a number of European thinkers took materialism back off the shelf, dusted it off, and began to propagate it again. Their aim was to do away with religious beliefs, and materialism was the only philosophy they could put up against religion. While supporting materialism on the one hand, Marx and Engels turned to a method known as dialectics, which claimed that conflict was the basic law of nature. For that reason, their theories came to be called dialectical materialism. Dialectics was a hypothesis maintaining that all development in the universe comes about as a result of conflict. The two philosophers attempted to interpret the history of the world in terms of dialectical materialism. Marx wrote books on history and economics, attempting to make these conform to that dogma, and Engels did the same for science and philosophy. Furthermore, Marx tried to see into the future. In his view, the industrialized nations of Europe would shortly undergo bloody revolutions, as a result of the dialectical principle of conflict. The working class, oppressed by the capitalists, would rise up and seize power, after which a communist system would be established. The concepts of religion, morality and the family would have no place in this communist society. Marx and Engels were faced with a major difficulty, however. They viewed human history through the lens of dialectical materialism, even if they had to distort that history in the process. But what about natural history? How had living things come into existence? There simply had to be a materialistic answer to that important question. That answer was provided by another ideologue, again living in England at the time. As the Royal Navy vessel the Beagle crossed the Atlantic Ocean on its voyage of discovery, it carried a young researcher on board: Charles Robert Darwin. After the long voyage on that ship, he returned to London in 1836. He spent the rest of his life trying to formulate a theory to explain how living things came into being. Darwin unveiled his theory in The Origin of Species, published in 1859. In it, he maintained that living things came into being in just the same way that materialist philosophy claimed, in other words by a series of coincidences. What is more, he proposed that these coincidences worked by means of conflict, as dialectic. In short, Darwin adapted nature to dialectical materialism. Darwin's theory had no scientific foundation. That is why prominent scientists of the time refused to take him seriously. Apart from two people: Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels! Just one month after the publication of The Origin of Species, on December 12, 1859, Engels began a letter to Marx with the words: "Darwin, whom I am j...