food web

food web

Overfishing may empty our oceans in 40 years

1d ago
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SUPPORT OUR CAMPAIGN BY BUYING OUR BOOK on amazon at http://goo.gl/Gt2Txd. Or go to http://www.onecirclefarms.com, http://www.onecirclegardens.com Support healthy, organic, sustainable food production. Support One Circle Farms' Indiegogo campaign and pre-order organic, sustainably raised fish delivered to your door or available for pickup at our farm. From afar, our seas look majestic, expansive and full of living creatures. The truth is, though, they are filled with pollution from oil spills, trash, septic tanks, and engine waste. And besides toxins in the water, our oceans have been affected by another killer: over-fishing. According to marine scientists, in less than 40 years, there may not be any fish at all for us to catch in the sea. How could this be? Our commercial fisheries have literally been racing to see who can catch the last fish. Right now, more than 75 % of all commercially caught fish are either threatened or endangered. Worse yet, over 90% of our largest fish have already been killed off. Today, our seas are more like deserts, with a dwindling fish population. Fish farming is championed as a solution to over-fishing, and in fact more than 50% of all seafood produced for human consumption is farmed. However, this traditional method of aquaculture is not environmentally sound. It is dependent on wild fish capture to actually feed the fish. 5 to 10 pounds of wild fish is used to produce every 1 pound of farmed fish. It is estimated that Salmon and trout farms in Norway alone produce roughly the same amount of sewage as all of New York City. We are in need of a movement to reduce the impact of fish consumption on our oceans. In the our new book, The Second Agricultural Revolution: How we can change the future of our food with Aquaponic Gardening, Ako Kitissou, the founder of One Circle Farms, offers us a solution to this issue of overfishing and toxic oceans. The book goes detail about the technology of Aquaponic gardening, which is a sustainable way to utilize closed-loop systems for organic vegetable and fish production. Residential and community aquaponics gardens, when properly applied, can enable us to develop a future of healthy food. Thank you for supporting our oceans! This video uses material which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution License 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/) Content Attribution: Protei - https://vimeo.com/16700146 Great Moments in Unintended Consequences - https://vimeo.com/18746474 Fishing Down the Food Web - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fishing_down_the_food_web NY Stock Exchange Traders - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:NY_stock_exchange_traders_floor_LC-U9-10548-6.jpg Seal Diver of the Farne Islands - https://vimeo.com/75356985 Successful Demonstration Originoil Aquaculture Process - https://vimeo.com/68555948 Carp Removed From Lake - http://www.flickr.com/photos/usfwsmtnprairie/5881590283/ Shrimp Bycatch - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bycatch Standard and Experimental Gills Nets - http://www.flickr.com/photos/virginiaseagrant/7159883664/ Shrimp Bycatch Heist - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Shrimp_bycatch_Heist.jpg Colorado River Project, Albuquerque, NM - https://vimeo.com/70786391 Aerial Tractor By Alessio Balza - https://vimeo.com/65496003 Citec Handbuilt Wheels made in Germany - https://vimeo.com/37584037