fern kinney

fern kinney

Fern Kinney - Groove Me (Promo 12" Mix) (HD) 1979

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Intended For Entertainment & Promotional Work Only! Thank You! I upload videos for fun and do not profit from YouTube Except for my Cyber-Friends Of Which I Have Many. They are The People who Make it Fun For Me :) Fern Kinney - Groove Me Label: T.K. Disco [401] Format: Vinyl, 12", 33 ⅓ RPM, Promo Country: U.S.A. Released: 1979 Genre: Electronic Style: Disco, Dance Companies etc: Distributed By: T.K. Productions, Inc. Mastered At: Sterling Sound Credits: Producer: Carson Whitsett, Tommy Couch, Wolf Stephenson Notes A side - Published by Malaco Music (BMI)/Roffignac Music (BMI) B side - Published by Malaco Music (BMI)/Rogan Music (BMI) (P)1979, Malaco, Inc. Fern Kinney was born in Jackson, Mississippi, a place she still calls home today. Practically nothing is known about her childhood or personal life. In the late 1960's, Fern replaced Patsy McClune in The Poppies, a female pop/R&B trio whose "Lullaby Of Love" on Epic Records had been a minor U.S. hit in 1966. Together with Rosemary Taylor and Dorothy Moore (also a successful solo artist later) she remained in the group for two years. Fern's first solo recording was "Your Love's Not Reliable" on Atlantic Records. A bluesy R&B number released in 1968. The song, far from a hit, forced Fern into work as a session singer for two local studios, Malaco and North American. During this time she backed such singers as Jean Knight, King Floyd, Frederick Knight and her old friend Dorothy Moore. Her voice can be heard on their hits "Mr. Big Stuff," "Groove Me," and "Misty Blue" to name a few. Eleven years after her first release Fern scored a summer smash in 1979. Fern chose to record a sultry "disco" version of King Floyd's R&B hit "Groove Me." The Malaco 7" single created such a buzz that Henry Stone picked it up for 12" release on his famed T.K. label. The rest is history as it peaked at #-6 on Billboard's Club Play charts. The album, released on Malaco, sold well but the overall flavor was more R&B than disco and another 12" single was not forth coming. In 1980, her revival of U.K. singer-songwriter Ken Leray's 1977 recording "Together We Are Beautiful" gave the singer, with the thin high voice, a surprise U.K. #-1 hit. Oddly, the record did very little in the U.S. In 1981 Fern had her last chart entry of any note. She scored a #-30 Billboard Club Play hit with yet another remake. She retread the hit "Let The Good Times Roll." The album also had my personal favorite and a song that could have been remixed into another hit, "There'll Never Be Another Night Like This." The album was actually quite good and loaded with dance tracks, however it was too late, for the death of "disco" had already set in. Further follow-ups failed to ignite any interest here or in the U.K. so Fern settled back into domestic bliss and session work. May Be Available From: http://www.discogs.com http://www.discomusic.com Absolutely No © Infringement Intended At All. Thank You♪ ________________________________________________