cultural olympiad

cultural olympiad

Fever--short video demo

1mo ago
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Description

A one minute demo of Radix Theatre's popular Fever, originally presented during HIVE 3 at the 2010 Cultural Olympiad in Vancouver, and later re-mounted in 2011 for the opening of Simon Fraser University's new downtown arts campus. Separate soundtracks were created for men and women, the text was identical but a female voice (Delia Brett) narrated for female patrons and a man's voice (Paul Ternes) for males. Written by Andrew Templeton, with dramaturgy by Paul Ternes Sound Design by Stefan Smulovitz Production stills by Tim Matheson Fever is an immersive theatrical experience set inside a shipping container. It is a short presentation, about 15 minutes in all, designed to take part alongside a larger event such as a gala, or an event with multiple activities going on. The production requires only two people to travel, relying on local technical support and five or more local performers. Fever begins when a performer, with costuming to suggest a medical background, roams through a crowd to inquire about peoples’ health saying things like “You don’t look so well, you look like you might have a fever. Would you like to come for a treatment?” If willing, the audience member is lead outside to a shipping container or other suitable location to suggest a makeshift emergency medical clinic. The audience member is seated in a waiting area with other patients and given a magazine to read while they wait. Soft music plays in the background. When the audience member’s turn comes they are lead inside the container where three performers dressed as nurses in germ-proof attire are ‘attending’ to other audience members. Each person lays down on a cot and is made comfortable with a blanket and pillow. Their eyes are covered and a pair of headphones is placed over their ears. This is when the “internal theatre” of Fever begins, as the audience member listens to a lyrical narration inviting them to contemplate their own mortality and life's accomplishments. During the soundtrack, the nurse performs various physical examinations that are timed to the soundtrack such as checking for pulse, examining the eyes, or waving a fragrance under their nose. The most gripping moment comes when the audience member opens their eyes to discover a mirror immediately in front of them. The mirror is slowly raised to give the viewer the feeling of an out-of-body experience. Fever has been critically acclaimed and is consistently appreciated by its audiences. "Radix's Fever I adored. In this piece, which refers to H1N1, masked doctors lead you to a field hospital that's been set up in a shipping container in the parking lot. There you are invited, lyrically and tenderly, to consider your own death. I don't want to give too much away. Let me just say that I was moved- and completely ready to pass over." Colin Thomas, The Georgia Straight "The trance-like state evoked by this piece left me in a strange and vulnerable state and once it was over, returning to the chaos of the main venue was a shock." Sebastien Archibald. PLANK Magazine "A stunning show about mortality, community, and the ethics of care..." Peter Dickson. Performance, Place and Politics critical theatre blog